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The Amazing Spider-Man 2: Review

The Amazing Spider-Man 2: Review

Spider-man, Spider-man, does whatever a spider can. Amazing Spider-Man is the follow up film to 2012′s, Amazing Spider-Man and sees the return of Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker/Spiderman. I was a massive fan of the previous Spidey film and praised Andrew’s performance as both Peter and the web-slinger. He nailed something in the character that I felt like Tobey McGuire was missing in his performances in the original three films. We get that solid character and performance continued on in the second Amazing film and he continues to show that he has acting chops. WARNING: Spoilers are in-bound. Use your Spidey Senses at your own discretion. Amazing Spider-Man 2 opens with a pretty hectic scene revolving around the disappearance of Richard, and Mary Parker whom are Peter’s parents. They’re aboard a private jet which is then hijacked by an assassin obviously sent from Oscorp, but Richard succeeds in sending out information that we learn about later on in the film. With the pilot dead the plane crashes and we can safely assume that both Richard and Mary are killed upon impact. Even though this scene doesn’t exactly explain much it was still a nice little thing for myself as a viewer to witness. However, I wouldn’t be entirely disappointed if it was cut from the final product. Boom. Fast forward to present day and Peter is still taking down baddies as Spider-Man. We then have him chase after one of the cooler Spider-Man villains, Aleksei Systevich/The Rhino (Paul Giamatti) who is attempting to steal a truck packed full of plutonium. Which I believe is a key ingredient in making nuclear bombs or something destructive like that. During this high-speed chase, Spidey saves a bumbling, apparently mentally unstable Oscorp employee by the name of Max Dillon (who would later become the film’s titular villain, Electro played by Jamie Foxx) which sort of sets up an encounter later on in the movie. While doing all these shenanigans he’s also on the phone with his girlfriend, Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone) in which he sees a “vision” of her father George Stacy (Dennis Leary) who died at the end of the first film. This reminds Peter that he made a promise to George to keep Gwen out of his life as Spider-Man. This causes the couple to break up. While I admit the relationship aspect of this film was sort of meh, it is an integral part of Peter’s story in the comics regarding the story between him and Gwen Stacy, so I can see that it needed to be played out. We then have an introduction of yet another character with Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan) whom was a child-hood friend of Peter’s and has returned to New York City to see his terminally ill father, Norman Osborn (Chris Cooper) to which he explains his illness is hereditary and that poor Harry is at the age in which it begins to develop. He gives Harry a small device which he explains contain his life’s work, and the following day he dies leaving Harry the now acting CEO of Oscorp. Gears begin to turn, things are set into motion, and my worry of multiple villains being introduced starts to show. We are then thrown right into a scene where Max whom now idolizes Spider-Man, and believes that they are friends is tending to some equipment in one of Oscorp’s laboratories and falls into a tank of genetically modified electric eels. The eels then begin to attack Max savagely, and he begins to mutate into a living electric generator and cause the birth of Electro. So, here is the third and main villain finally starting to pop up in the film. Things are moving pretty fast plot-wise, but I’m still hooked. Let’s get back to the relationship sub-plot with Gwen and Peter. I have to throw this out there though. This relationship/chemistry is definitely easier to handle and watch unlike in the original films between Tobey and Kirsten Dunst. So, we learn that Gwen is thinking of going to England for school which obviously looks like it stuns Peter and upsets him. Before they can fully talk about the situation Electro ends up in Times Square and causes a scene. This in turn causes Peter to suit up and go handle the situation in the best way we can. When Peter arrives as Spider-Man we see that police are preparing to fire on Electro if he does anything. As Spider-Man is attempting to calm him down the police open fire on Electro who loses his temper and attack the police. Spider-Man eventually beats Electro and he’s quickly shipped off to Ravencroft which is a type of prison for the mentally ill. This is where we get the first glimpse of how Electro is what you’d call a “tragic villain” and it’s not his fault he’s insane. He’s got some kind of mental illness that causes him to lash out and get angry. He just wants people to know who he is. I really like how they made Electro look in the film. Most of his outfits in the comics are pretty weak, and it’s a relief they didn’t go with something like his green, and yellow outfit that makes him look like some type of daffodil. I love this look of Electro and I can imagine they’ll probably incorporate this look into the comic (unless they already have, I haven’t been up to date on my Spidey comics in a while). Let’s get back to the film. Then we’re thrust into another plot-line revolving around Harry Osborn. Remember him? It looks like his illness has begun to show its symptoms and his father’s device helps him deduce that Spider-Man’s blood might help save his life and cure his disease. Sadly, the way they explain this is kind of weak and I’m still not too sure how that plan would exactly work. The only thing I could grasp is that later on in the film we learn more about Richard Parker explaining that he injected his own DNA or something into the spiders from Oscorp which obviously explains how Peter bonded with the spider so well when it bit him. It’s still a pretty weak and vague explanation. So, to make matters worse for dear, old Harry it turns out that Oscorp has framed him for the accident with Max Dillon which caused him to turn into the villain Electro which causes him to lose his title as CEO. We then have Felicia Hardy (BLACK CAT IN THE COMICS, OH SHIT) tell Harry that there may be some equipment that could save his life, so he goes to meet Max/Electro and strikes a deal with the blue guy to get himself back into the Oscorp Building. This is when he finds some of the venom from the genetically engineered spiders and instead of curing Harry it turns him into some horribly, disgusting looking goblin-like creature. Welcome to the birth of Green Goblin, our other villain in this film. I must be in the minority that didn’t see an issue with the villains in this movie. The main villain of the film is Electro, and it’s obvious. Green Goblin, and Rhino are only in the film for a few minutes for key plot points to set up the following films. It’s not too hard to comprehend and for me it didn’t ruin anything in terms of quality of the film. I still enjoyed watching the movie, and I think Dane DeHaan’s Green Goblin is by far the best looking Goblin we’ve had in most Spider-Man media. James Franco’s Green Goblin was just…lame. Then again, he was Hobgoblin wasn’t he? I don’t remember, Spider-Man 3 was kinda wank. Anyways. We’re then thrown right back into the relationship (which I enjoyed, bring the hate) with Gwen calling Peter and leaving a message explaining that she went to the airport because the scholarship in England got accepted earlier then they thought. Not wanting to leave on bad terms, Peter meets Gwen on the bridge and professes his love for her and vows to go to England with her, which would obviously cause him to stop being Spider-Man but we know that’s not going to happen considering Electro is still around somewhere. Then again, Peter still think he’s locked up. However, Electro decides to ruin this touching moment by causing a mass blackout so Peter leaves the scene to go fight Electro, and against his comfort Gwen follows him. The two of them restore power, and causes an overload which seemingly kills Electro, but I pretty much doubt he can be killed that easily. We’ll see in the next films won’t we? Harry shows up with his power amor, and Glider and sees Gwen which leads him to figure out that Spidey is Peter Parker and vows to get revenge on him for refusing the blood transfusion from Spider-Man and kidnaps Gwen and flies to the top of a clock tower. The two of them have an all out brawl with Spider-Man subduing Harry, but fails to save Gwen who falls from some gears in the tower to her death. This scene in particular is probably the strongest in the entire film for multiple reasons. It distinguishes a major element in the development of Peter Parker as a character and how he handles the death of his love in his future as Spider-Man. It’s a pivotal moment for him as a character and they captured that moment beautifully on film. It also makes some subtle hints to the comic issue where Gwen is killed off. She wears a very similar outfit to the one she wore in the comic the night she died, and once she hits the ground after her fall the clock strikes the time of 1:21, and the comic issue she died in was 121 which was released in 1973. This pleased the Spidey comic book fan inside me greatly, aside from the tragic, tear-jerking scene of Peter weeping over the body of the girl he was in love with. This also makes sense as to why Mary Jane Watson was cut from the film in the end. It wouldn’t of suited how we were supposed to feel emotionally at the conclusion. It feels better this way, and I can imagine fans of the Spiderman comics, and films can agree on this point. Even if you didn’t enjoy the film, I’d like to think that this scene in particular hit home with everyone. It was being foreshadowed for the entire film, and it was always inevitable. However, five months pass and we learn that Peter has stopped being Spider-Man for good, which I hate to say it is a common thing that bothers me about superhero films. Something usually happens in one of the franchises that causes the hero to “quit” being who they are because of a death, or some sort of tragic event. I get that it’s a part of character development but I’m actually fed up with seeing it. Minor complaint and all. Harry is healing from his grotesque transformation and is approached by Gustav Friers (the man in the shadows from the first film) who discuss the formation of a small team to take out Spider-Man which is a nod the group formed in the comics called the Sinister Six and the fact we’re getting a spin-off film about them makes me a happy camper. We also get a secondary nod with this by seeing Doc Ock’s arms, Vulture’s Wings, and the Rhino’s mechanical suit. This evil duo make their first move by freeing Aleksei and giving him the suit, which thus gives birth to The Rhino (one of my favorite Spidey villains besides early Venom, and Carnage). We’re then treated with a scene where Rhino inside the mechanical suit, which looks completely bad-ass. I really loved the design and over-all look of it. I’m glad they went this route because I imagine just some bloke wearing a Rhino looking skin-tight outfit would of been lame and sort of…underwhelming. But wait, is that Spider-Man? Nope, it’s a small child dressed as Spider-Man attempting to confront The Rhino. Pretty brave kid, I wouldn’t have the balls to do that unless I had some form of super-power or like…anti-tank weapon. We’re then treated with a lovely scene where Peter is watching Gwen’s graduation speech which inspires him and he goes out to meet Rhino head on, and ultimately saves the kid. And, the film just sort of abruptly ends with Spidey attacking Rhino, which obviously is probably set up for the third Amazing film, and we’ll most likely see The Rhino as the titular villain in that movie. I’m perfectly okay with this because Paul Giamatti is a superb actor and from the few minutes we saw of him in the movie I’m excited. — VERDICT: Amazing Spider-Man 2 may not be as good as the first film, but I enjoyed my time with it. I still think Andrew Garfield is the perfect choice for Spider-Man, and the chemistry between him and Emma Stone really shows on screen. The two of them are wonderful together and I’d like to see them work together more often, which might be a stretch considering they are a real-life couple (eat that up comic fans). Of course the plot did jump around a bit, and there was some bits that seemed like they were shoehorned in and really didn’t serve much of a purpose. Jamie Foxx was superb as Electro, and I feel like he was one of the selling points in the movie. I’m not understanding the hate behind the film, and the only logical thing I can think of is people expected it to be something it’s not. It’s a setup film, and if you go into your viewing realizing that, and knowing that you’re probably going to have a good time with the movie. It’s far from being a terrible movie like most of the critics are saying. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 gets a solid… 7/10    ...

Retrospective Review: The Witcher 2 Enhanced Edition (360)

Retrospective Review: The Witcher 2 Enhanced Edition (360)

With most peoples attention on the new generation of systems, it’s easy to forgot some of decent games available on the 360 and PS3. The Witcher 2 Enhanced Edition remains as one of the most overlooked titles on the 360. A fantastic port of the PC classic, The Witcher 2 is still worth picking up today, even more so with the Witcher 3′s delay into early 2014. But just how good is the 360 version of The Witcher 2?   The dark and brutal tale of The Witcher 2 had PC gamers stunned and in awe of what they had just experienced. The Witcher 2 was the definitive story driven role playing game of last year, now its time for The Witcher 2 to launch its assault on consoles. Does this fantasy tale of revenge mange to carry over to the home consoles, or is the quality lost in translation? The Witcher 2 sets the tone for its story telling nature from the off. Opening up with series protagonist Geralt being questioned over the murder of King of Temeria, King Foltest. From here Geralt begins his vigilante search for the true King Slayer. The land of Temeria is in chaos with various factions tying to take advantage of the death of the King. Geralt’s search is met with plenty of twists and turns with each outcome affecting the story line. The Witcher 2 is jam packed with decisions for the player to make, no matter how big or small every decision has a impact on the storyline. These decisions don’t just result in a extra bit of gold or loot, or even a new skill, they do in fact shape the overall story telling experience. This allows the storyline to twist and turn to the extent the player is left pondering their own actions.     It’s rare for video games to implement player decisions in such an effective manner. It never feels like you’re simply in a game world following a storyline, instead it feels like this game world bows to your choices and actions. It’s a true sense of role playing that is rarely achieved in video games. Examples of big decisions come early on in the shape of Geralt’s encounter with a traitor by the name of Aryan La Valette. Geralt can either strike him down in a duel or talk him into surrender. Talking Valette into surrendering effects the early stages of the game and adds a whole new cut scene in the process, as well as affecting Geralt’s reputation with the world’s factions. The range of consequences your decisions have can be felt within the first chapter of the game. There’s a number of different outcomes very early on with two totally differing climaxes, both of which feel as well worked as the other. The decisions can even propel your adventures to different towns during the second chapter of the game. While both towns share familiar maps and primary objectives , the NPCs (and thus conversations and personalities) and secondary quests are unique to their respective towns. This adds a genuine sense of choosing your own path within the world as well as giving the world a true feeling of being alive.   Interaction between Geralt and the supporting cast (as well as the NPC’s) never comes off as feeling trivial. Conversations flow naturally and engage the player regardless of the subject. This is both a testament to the high quality script and the voice acting. The over use of British (cockney for the most part) may boil the blood of some but they do serve purpose. Accents differ depending on location, much like real life, and how privileged the NPC/character is. It’s a nice touch that a lot of modern role playing games tend to forget about, and it adds a realistic layer to the world.   One issue that carries over from the PC original is the the over-abundance of ‘hidden lore’. While the game has plenty of back story for the player to look into, it’s easy to become a little confused as to some of the game’s lore. An example of this is that there is no obvious reason for everyone’s hatred of Nilfgaard. Characters and NPC’s will often curse the name of Nilfgaard but rarely do they give a clear reason why. Reasons can be found if the player takes time out to search through the mountains of lore to look up Nilfgaard. It’s not a huge issue but does catch players off guard. It’s a subjective issues if this is a case of too much of a good thing. The Witcher 2′s combat system has slightly been improved upon during its transition from PC to console. The core combat involves switching from sword type and spell type depending on the enemy and situation. Geralt is armed with one steel sword (used to slay humanoids) and one silver sword (used to slay creatures) along with several spells. The spells range from setting enemies alight to buffing Geralts defense temporarily and useful stun attacks. The controls are easy enough to adapt to with the X controlling your attacks (holding X results in a heavy strike, tapping X in a light, quick attack) and the triggers acting as your defensive skills and ‘focus’ move. Focusing on a target allows Geralt to counter enemy attacks (once the skill is unlocked) by a well timed button push while in defensive stance. Geralt can evade enemy strikes via simple push of the B button however spamming the move is a bad idea.     The stamina meter plays a large part in the games combat. Spamming the doge button is a huge drain on the stamina bar, this has a effect on Geralt’s ability to cause damage and parry enemy attacks. Other methods of combat can be found in the shape of taps, throwing daggers and bombs. These items offer a number of tactical routes in combat such as stunning enemies, and in some cases turning enemies against each other. On any difficulty setting, bar easy, players will find themselves struggling against early enemies Geralt encounters. This highlights the importance of drinking potions Geralt can create. Potions are created by combing various herbs found throughout the game. Combing potions is a key element to The Witcher 2′s gameplay, as each potion plays its part in establishing Geralt’s combat efficiency. Some potions increase damage done with swords, others increase stamina regain. The potion side of the game allows the player to approach combat in the way they prefer as well as adding a slight touch of strategy to proceedings. The combat has always been some what of a thorn in The Witcher’s side as a franchise but things have improved slightly in its debut on the Xbox 360. Improvements in the combat are partly due to a new upgraded interface specifically designed for the 360. This doesn’t mean its flawless however. Things can become quite messy when forced into a corner by a number of enemies, this creates a tricky situation of trying to attack one target at a time. The camera also comes into a play and can often blind side the player leading to a few cheap hits and in some cases death. At times the ‘invisible’ walls also rear their ugly head adding to issues the combat suffers (although this issue also applies to exploring too). While these issues aren’t game breaking by any means they are never the less frustrating.     The presentation of The Witcher 2 is to a high standard. Environments are well detailed, there’s a obvious attention to detail in each location Geralt finds himself in. The Witcher 2 has a decent range of locations to venture through, from inner city streets to grimey towns by the sea, the game never falls below a high standard of visual quality. The way in which the environments are lit play a key part in their beauty. Lights reflect and bounce in a natural manner, which adds extra detail to the world. Some sections mange to look so fantastic that you cant help but just stand back and take in the sites.   Character models and animation are a key attribute to the success of The Witcher 2′s storytelling. Characters look fantastic due to a number of reasons. The majority of models have at least one unique feature to them, be it a scar or a spot. This adds that sense of humanity that is necessary for a video game character to be believable. The NPC’s rarely look alike, resulting in the world feeling that little bit more natural. The core cast of characters play host to the greatest detail, for obvious reasons. Their eyes glaze and move in such a manner you almost forget they are simply a video game character. Facial animation is smooth and never comes off as synthetic or unnatural. This attention to detail aids conversations between characters, helping them to become engrossing and natural. Audio wise, The Witcher 2 is a treat and the musical scores are a vital part to the drama on offer. From booming music, which evokes a feeling of combat and tension, to soft pieces that bring a sense of calm, The Witcher 2 has it all. Sound effects are crisp on the ear and particular kudos go to the work on the creature sounds which avoid coming across as generic. Voice acting is one of the many highlights of the experience, from the smooth tone of Geralt to the arrogant almost pretentious voices of his enemies , The Witcher 2 never lets up. A strong script requires strong voice acting and thankfully The Witcher 2 is a prime example of this. There are only a few examples (mostly minor quest givers) of what could be considered flat voice acting, beyond that however there is only quality. The main issue the Witcher 2 suffers from, is its the somewhat abrupt ending. The first two chapters are nothing short of epic. There are a number of sections in which the game commands the players attention and appreciation for the work at hand. The first chapter of the game sets up the games atmosphere and themes, easing players for the experience they are about to embark upon. The second chapter ramps up the drama and tension within the story and feels like a run up to an explosive climax. The third chapter however brings a ending that doesn’t match the build up. Side plots feel like they have ended prematurely and feel a little rough handed. Some characters roles in the plot are dumped to ensure a quick route to the ending. It leaves a few question unanswered and detracts from the sense of scale the storytelling has managed to create. It’s not a terrible way to end the game, it is in fact a rather rough way to end it.   The Witcher 2 is a genuinely a fantastic role playing experience. The power the player has in their decisions is unmatched in modern day video games. The core combat has been slightly improved upon with the games transition to the Xbox 360, but its not without a few fiddly controls and camera angle issues. The visuals are top notch as too is the audio, its nothing short of a treat to open your eyes and ears to. Rarely does a game mange to engage a player in such a manner in which they feel like the story bends to their will and not the developers. Multiple endings add replay value, and the game time of around 20-35 hours of core content guarantee you’ll get your moneys worth. The Xbox 360 version of The Witcher 2 is a showcase in how to port a PC game to the consoles successfully. Everything works well, both in a gameplay sense and a technical sense. With a extra four hours of new content added to the 360 version there is even a reason for PC Witcher 2 veterans to experience the story on the consoles. The only true issue the Witcher 2 struggles from is the half baked climax, it simply does not match the rest of the game’s high quality of story telling and writing. Bold, beautiful, brutal, dramatic, glorious, engrossing and epic are just a few words to describe this role playing experience. The Witcher 2 is quite simply the best story driven role playing game on the Xbox 360. Minor faults are drowned out by supreme quality. The Witcher 2: Assassins Of Kings is a must play experience that will satisfy anyone (RPG fan or not) who can appreciate a well crafted role playing experience with epic story telling.      ...

Review: Supernatural — S09E05 “Dog Dean Afternoon”

Review: Supernatural — S09E05 “Dog Dean Afternoon”

Supernatural is back again this week with another “monster of the week” episode, and ends up being an extremely light-hearted and fun adventure. Spoilers Ahead: The episode opens in a taxidermist’s workshop with a man making some Game Of Thrones-esque sculptures using what appears to be a muskrat. The man hears a sound, and goes to investigate only to find nothing in the shop. He returns to his workstation and is immediately surprised by a man wearing a cowboy outfit whom then flashes a forked tongue (much like a snake) and constricts him to death, much like an anaconda would while the taxidermist’s dog, Colonel watches as his master is killed. Very straight to the point, and it left me wondering what the monster was. Some type of snake creature? That’s what it looked like we were going to get, so I was instantly hooked. The brothers eventually end up investigating the case, even though Dean says it might not be a good idea saying how Sam is still on the mend from the Trials in the previous season (even though we know it has something to do with Zeke; the angel possessing Sam). Once getting there they learn that the dog, Colonel was the only other person there during the death of the owner, and head back to their motel room to investigate a strange symbol they found on the shop door, believing it to be some sort of Wiccan symbol. The brothers learn the symbo isn’t Wiccan in nature at all, but is instead the logo of a local “Peta-like” group whom tried using scare tactics to stop the taxidermist’s business by covering his front door in blood, and writing death threats in the blood. However, they tell the brothers that they were scared off by hissing, and believing they were sprayed with mace. They remove their glasses to reveal injured eyes, and Sam reveals through research that the injuries were most likely caused by snake venom being spat into the eyes. This confuses the brothers as snakes who constrict won’t use venom, and vice versa. The brothers are then drawn to an animal shelter where another victim has been found with slash marks on his neck, as if he was mauled by some sort of cat. The victim whom had discovered the “cowboy” man eating a cat, was then promptly killed. Thus revealing some more interesting details about the killer/monster. He’s obviously not a snake creature, as snakes don’t use claws to kill their prey. So, what is he? Dean then notices the same dog from the first crime scene locked up at the animal shelter, and realizes that this dog, Colonel had witnessed both deaths of the taxidermist, and teenager working at the shelter. Sam mentions an old Eskimo spell that would allow the person to “mind-meld” with an animal, and communicate with them. They make the spell, and Dean drinks the concoction but is let down when nothing happens, and that he can’t talk to Colonel who is now with them in the motel. Then, out of the blue a mysterious voice tells Dean to change the channel, and we soon realize it’s the dog, and that Dean can now communicate with all types of animals. However, the mind-meld worked both ways and now Dean has acquired some dog-like traits, which is shown by him playing fetch with Sam, and barking at the mail-man. Colonel tells them what the killer looks like, so the Brothers and Colonel head to the shelter so Dean can get some more clues from the other animals there. This in turn gives us a hilarious little bit where Sam must rub the belly of a dog so it can give Dean clues about the killer, whom we then learn is the head-chef at a restaurant. Upon arriving at the restaurant, Sam realizes that the Chef is eating animal organs, and obtaining some abilities of said animals using a shamanistic ritual. The duo decide to split-up and kill the Chef, which results in Sam being attacked by the Chef who has been concealed against a wall, like a chameleon and slashes at Sam’s throat, delivering a fatal blow. However, Zeke takes control again and heals Sam’s wound which obviously confuses Sam, but also intrigues the Chef who now intends on devouring Sam’s heart and gaining his healing abilities to help rid himself of his cancer. Dean encounters the scenario, and is attacked and tied up by the Chef who contemplates on how he’ll kill Dean, before eating a Wolf heart. Dean manages to break-free, and leads the Chef on a chase leading outside where Dean calls on a pack of dogs he let free earlier on in the episode who eventually tear the Chef to pieces killing him. A pretty hilarious way to kill someone in my opinion, and the episode in general took us away from all the dark, and gritty and gave us something humorous and light-hearted. The ending also lends itself to question whether Sam is starting to realize something is going on with the whole “healing” and blacking out thing. I’d be questioning things myself if I knew my throat was gashed open, but then the next minute it was completely healed. I guess we’ll see what happens next week. Definitely a good episode of Supernatural, even though it felt like it was resolved a little too quickly and that things just happened to fall into place. I guess that’s what we should expect in a more “positive mood” episode. Lots of humor to this one. I give it an 8/10.  ...

Review: The Walking Dead — S04E04 “Indifference”

Review: The Walking Dead — S04E04 “Indifference”

Season 4 is turning out to be my favorite season of the series yet, and is slowly removing the bad taste left in my mouth from Season 3, and that god-awful finale. With only four episodes in, it seems like the major “villain”/adversary for this season will be the flu like sickness that has hit the prison, and made many of the residents sick. Spoilers ahead for this episode. This episode puts the flu on the backburner, and instead focuses on two groups set out to gather supplies to hopefully aid in their survival, as well as combat the flu-like sickness that has taken its toll on some of the residents. The two groups include Daryl, Tyreese, Michonne, and Bob whereas the other group is just Rick, and Carol. Daryl’s group attempts to find a new vehicle after losing their previous one to a horde of Walkers. The find the new vehicle, and clear away some vines only to have Tyreese (still sad/angry about Karen’s death) chop at the vines too vigorously, and in turn releases the Walkers hiding inside the autoshop. After struggling, and failing to let go of the Walker, Tyreese is eventually saved by Bob who shoots said Walker in the head, killing it. It really feels like the deaths of Karen & David are taking its toll on Tyreese and it seems like he’s becoming more, and more unstable and could prove to be a risk to the group later on this season. The same could also be said for Bob as later on in the episode him and Daryl have an exchange about how him grabbing the bottle of booze in the season premiere caused the Walkers to swarm, and cause Zach’s death for which he blames himself. This happens again as towards the end of the episode we see Bob trying to save a bag of what we perceive as medicine from falling off a ledge where Walkers are swarming, but he refuses to drop the bag at the group’s request. The bag is saved, and Daryl pulls out a bottle of alcohol, and an argument is had with Bob almost pulling his gun on Daryl. So, it could also be said that Bob’s drinking problem is a risk to the group as it had caused Zach to die, and risked the lives of Tyreese, Daryl, and Michonne this week. If something doesn’t happen that fixes Bob’s alcoholism, I entirely expect him to die somewhere this season. We’ll see what happens. The story with Carol, and Rick for this episode was also really tense to watch, not knowing how Rick was going to react at Carol killing Karen, and David whom were extremely sick, and posed a risk to the rest of the group. Rick is seen to be mulling over the situation for the entire episode, and we learn that Carol has changed, and adopted a new mindset that revolves around kill or be killed, which we’ve seen throughout this season so far. They find two survivors while raiding a house whom are Sam, and Ana and are both injured. Sam with his dislocated shoulder which Carol fixes, and Ana with her busted leg that didn’t heal properly. Carol & Rick seem to be conflicted about whether letting Sam, and Ana join them but Rick decides to let them go out, get supplies and then meet back at the same house 2 hours later.  While going out for supplies Rick, and Carol have a discussion about killing someone for the better of the group. Carol brings up Rick killing Shane in Season 2 and it seems like they’re both on the same page, and that Rick has accepted Carol’s choice in killing Karen, and David. However, they soon come across the body of Ana being devoured by Walkers, and head back to the house to see if  Sam is there waiting. Hours pass, and Sam is nowhere to be seen so Carol decides they should leave, even though Sam might be okay, people will be expecting them back soon. As they’re packing up, and getting ready to leave Rick finally discusses the situation of Carol killing Karen, and David and mentions that he’s doing it for himself, and his children. He also mentions that Karen, and David could of been okay and survived but they never would of known/gotten the chance as Carol had killed them, for the “better of the group.” So, in the end it seems like Rick doesn’t trust Carol and tells her to leave the group and that she’s strong enough to be on her own now. It feels weird having a long-running character just get asked to the leave the group for good. However, I think I can side with Rick on this decision some-what. Carol made a huge decision without really thinking everything through, and in the end killed two people that could of totally been okay, and survived the flu, but were never given the chance. Where as back in Season Two, Rick killed Shane because he proved to be a threat, and even attempted to kill Rick. His actions were for the better of the group, where as Carol’s remain to be seen that way, but I guess time will tell. However, I also feel that Rick is saving Carol as well with this decision. If she came back to the prison with him, and Tyreese found out he would most likely kill Carol for killing Karen. So, for me it feels like Rick is also saving her life by asking her to leave, and start fresh. I do feel like this is the last time we’ll see Carol though. She’s too much of a major character to just be let go like that. I’m also curious to see what happens with the other characters, especially the ones who have all become sick from the flu. How many will die, and from the sneak peak it looks like more of them have turned and attacked the others. Will Tyreese’s anger over the death of Karen continue to make him more volatile, and will Bob’s drinking problems play a bigger part in the rest of the season? And how will the prison group react to Rick returning without Carol? I guess we’ll have to wait until next week. This episode gets a 9/10. Definitely one of the better episodes of the show’s run....