Video Games / Platform / PS4

The Double Edged Sword Of The Fighter Genre

The Double Edged Sword Of The Fighter Genre

With the recent reveal of Street Fighter V, I decided to look back on my experiences with the fighter genre. It’s a harsh genre, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. The fighting game genre has always been a harsh mistress to me. For every happy memory I have of the genre there’s about 3 bad memories that shortly follow. From a young age I became interested in the fighter genre. My first experience with the genre was (unsurprisingly) Capcoms Street Fighter 2 on the Super Nintendo. From the first minute of the game I was hooked. The characters looked visually interesting, the environments dazzling and the action thrilling. Playing solo was fun but lets face it, fighters are meant to be played against people and not AI. Playing Street Fighter 2 against friends (and some times family) is still one of my most treasured video game memories. Booting up the game and selecting our favourite characters before arguing over which level to fight in was tradition. Button mashing in a desperate panic was also tradition. In the process of pressing all the buttons in any given order a special move would normally be unleashed, leaving me and buddy in a stunned silence. ”HOW DID YOU DO THAT?!” was often the question on our lips, and the answer to that question was ALWAYS ”no idea’. Even with a limited knowledge of the game and its controls each match was always a great slice of fun. These sweet natured days were numbered however as I began to grow up.     As time went on and I played more and more fighters, my longing for victory became stronger. Button mashing was no longer a style I felt happy to use, it had become ‘messy’. Instead I would try a few characters out and learn the move sets. By time I came into possession of Dreamcast I had a decent amount of knowledge of Soulcalibur. I wasn’t a master by any means but I had learned at least a few moves for each character. Suddenly playing against friends had become more of a practice session than just a few games in the name of fun. Losing felt a lot worse, victory felt less meaningful, it was a strange feeling. For the most part I would be able to take down most of my friends, this resulted in the game becoming a little boring to play for them. Understanding the game had ultimately led to the ‘fun’ of the game being drained away.   The likes of Capcom Vs SNK, Street Fighter 3 alpha and Marvel Vs Capcom had returned all the fun of fighters. I applied a much more laid back approach to these fighters in order to keep the game fun for my friends to play against me. By this time in our lives we preferred to learn the game rather than button mash, this led to competitive, but fun, matches. It seemed the perfect middle ground and a great time to enjoy some top class fighting games. The enjoyment of the genre (and fighting friends) hit its peek with Marvel Vs Capcom 2. Given the popularity of the PS2 all of my friends owned the system and Marvel Vs Capcom 2. This allowed everyone to stand a fair chance of learning the game and forming an effective team. Many a battle was fought, plenty a laugh was had, this was the highlight of my time with the fighter genre. There was always a giddy feeling when it came to each team being down to their last member. A single hit would decide the match, the aftermath involved boasting and looking back at the action.    I had went from casual matches with friends that were all about the fun to competitive games of knowledge and technique. One day (well when I got my own computer) I just stopped playing fighters. From 2004 to 2008 I honestly cant remember playing a fighter for more than a few days. I kept a eye on the genre, watched it develop, but I never got back into the swing of things. 2009 saw the return of the franchise that started it all for me, I am of course referring to street Fighter. The fourth entry into the franchise was a first day purchase for me. After a first few runs on arcade I decided to hit up the online options. This is where things got rough. A large segment of players from overseas had been playing Street Fighter 4 for roughly a week. This week earlier release date had created a huge divide it terms of player skill. Time after time I was matched up with players who had already learned the mechanics and moves of a number of characters. My arse was getting well and truly kicked. I was now feeling the way my friends did when they used to play Soulcalibur against me, it wasn’t fun. I tried to learn the game, learn some strategies but alas my efforts were met with more defeats. Only a few of my friends had bought Street Fighter 4, this limited my chances of just casual fun matches. When they did happen, more often than not, I’d end up winning purely because I had learned some easy moves of a certain character. My friends soon began to grow tired of playing me and I was once again forced into playing online. While I did improve my overall play the huge gulf in skill and experience was too much to overcome. I enjoyed Street Fighter 4 a lot, I kept it in my collection in order to play when friends came over or my father fancied a game. Online I was nothing short of a easy win for any given player. For a large length of time I kept my activity within the fighter genre strictly offline. Marvel Vs Capcom 3 and Mortal Kombat (reboot…or 9 as some wish to label it) became my fighters of choice. While Marvel Vs Cacpom 3 was a little light in terms of content Mortal Kombat was jam packed. With plenty to do in terms of single player I was more than happy to play Mortal Kombat offline. The lure of playing online is hard to resist however, and yet again I found myself being beat down by veterans. All the enjoyment I had experienced with Mortal Kombat offline was now being replaced with defeat and defeat. The sheer amount of spam I became the victim of was heart breaking. Seeing Stryker spam his ranged attacks over and over killed my motivation to play Mortal Kombat online, it was nothing short of brutal. I was awful at the game, but my lack of enjoyment online killed any motivation to improve.     Fast forward to EVO 2012. I’m sitting at my desk browsing Twitch TV, and I’m once again interested in fighters. After watching the majority of the Marvel Vs Capcom 3 tournament my interest in the game re-surged. I knew for a fact I was going to lose, and lose hard, but either way I was going to try my hand at the online portion of the game. My assumptions were proved to be correct, I did in fact get my arse kicked, but I didn’t mind. I oddly didn’t mind losing, my competitive nature had taken a back seat. With my rediscovered relax nature towards the game I began to sit and learn….how to lose. While defeat is never fun it did allow me to experiment and tinker with my team selection. Before I knew it I was presenting a viable challenge to some players, some times even winning. The thrill of the fighter genre rushed back, everything I remembered had returned. In a moment of nostalgia I dragged my father into a game and began to play. It was like being young again playing Street Fighter 2 for the first time.   My love affair with the genre had been long and eventful. It had highs and lows, at times I had fallen out with the genre only to make up with it some time later. Learning to handle defeat is key to enjoying the fighter game genre, expecting victory is a recipe for frustration. Remembering why I loved the genre in the first place was key to recapturing the thrill, enjoyment and fun that I had all but lost.  ...

Square-Enix & The Problematic Final Fantasy 7 Fail Safe

Square-Enix & The Problematic Final Fantasy 7 Fail Safe

Oh Square-Enix, how the mighty fall…then get back up again and stumble around a bit. As someone who grew up, partly at least, playing JRPGS, Square-Enix played a large part on my video game playing life. Chrono Trigger, Final Fantasy 7,8 and 9, Dragons Quest, Final Fantasy Tactics. The game that stands out most in that line up (not for me, but for most people) is Final Fantasy 7. the ‘classic’. Final Fantasy 7 went beyond the realms of being ‘just another game’, it’s constantly being brought back up when ever a discussion on JRPGs occurs. It’s celebrated as a crowning moment in RPG history, Square-Enix’s history and the video game industry as a whole. It’s impossible to deny the impact the game had, regardless of personal feelings towards the game. The problem is, Square-Enix never seemed to get out of the shadow of Final Fantasy 7, be it in their video games or in their general approach to business. Before the release of Final Fantasy 7, the franchise tended to jump around in terms of tone and characters. You’d be reassured that every time you sat down to play a Final Fantasy game, you’d be meeting a whole host of new, interesting, characters. That changed with the success of Final Fantasy 7. The ‘dark, brooding’ character came into fashion and flashed in and out of the franchise ever since. This was especially true with the character of Squall, the floppy fringed student who was never happy and always ‘conflicted’. While Final Fantasy 8 wasn’t a bad game (truth be told, I prefer it over 7) it always felt like it was in the shadow of Final Fantasy 7, trying to maintain some of the traits of its predecessor.   The real issue with Final Fantasy 7′s success is the way in which it has been handled. No longer is it a jewel in the crown of Square-Enix, it’s now a quick buck, a means to stay relevant without the effort. The best example of this being the recent reveal of Final Fantasy 7 being thrown onto the PS4. No additions, changes or anything of the like, it’s the same old thing we’ve had thrown around for years now. Do Square-Enix owe their fans any HD version of Final Fantasy 7? no, but they do owe their fans a decent port. It reeks of laziness when the same old version of the game is thrown around, across various formats for multiple years. It’s yet another ‘quick buck’ move from Square which leaves a sour taste in the mouth of it’s fans, who’ve endured quite lot of sours tastes with Square the last few years. After the train wreck that was Final Fantasy 14, since fixed after a re-launch, and the ‘meh’ feelings towards Final Fantasy 13 and it’s spin-offs, Square could do with some positive vibes. It’s not like Square and incapable of doing good re-releases, just look at Final Fantasy X & X2.   Square wouldn’t constantly bring back Final Fantasy 7 if it wasn’t bringing in the money. The sheer love towards the game will naturally bring a solid amount of customers in, which is arguably part of the problem. Whenever Square run into problems, be it cash related or multiple games being delayed, they fall back to releasing Final Fantasy 7. It’s frustrating to see them do this yet again, even more so in the manner it was announced. A quick run onto the stage followed by a trailer and some extremely broken English. It’s almost like Square don’t even care that they look lazy these days. Square don’t seem happy with cheapening the modern Final Fantasy franchise, they seem hell bent on cheapening the past glories as well.    ...

Street Fighter V’s Exclusivity Is Far From A Bad Thing

Street Fighter V’s Exclusivity Is Far From A Bad Thing

The recent news that Street Fighter V will be a PS4/PC exclusive has left some feeling a bit..frustrated. The frustration seemingly coming from how the reveal came out of no where. It’s a surprising move given Capcom seemed to be in the Microsoft camp given the exclusive release of Dead Rising 3. Like It or not, Street Fighter V is a massive feather in Sony’s cap, but it’s not all doom and gloom for those invested into one system. The reaction to Street Fighter V, or least some of it, would lead you to believe the Xbox One has no fighters…which is far from the truth. The Xbox One boasts one of the best exclusives on the market in the shape of Killer Instinct. While the brand power of Killer Instinct may not be as relevant as Street Fighter, the quality is still there. Killer Instinct offers a unique fighting experience, there isn’t anything truly like it on the market, bar the originals.   It’s disappointing that such a great game has seemingly been forgotten. There’s a slight hope that the hype around Street Fighter V will indirectly shed a little light back on the mega combo fighter. There’s questions over just how exclusive Street Fighter V is. With Capcom known for releasing various editions of pretty much every Street Fighter. it’s not yet clear if future (for examples sake let’s say Super Street Fighter V) versions would be tied down to the PS4/PC. The exclusivity of Street Fighter V make sense, especially for Capcom. The growth of the PS4 player base, combined with Sony’s strong presence in the Asian market, make the deal a smart move for a struggling Capcom. With Sony partly funding the game, the pressure to perform is taken off Capcom slightly. Perks like cross-platform play (as seen with the likes of Final Fantasy 14) would also, at leas you’d suspect, be another reason why Capcom and Sony have teamed up.   It’s hardly a deal made in spite that some corners of the community are trying to suggest, far from it. A solid business decision that allows Capcom to carry on without worrying (too much) about their struggles of late. It’s a slick move by Sony, and perhaps a ploy become the system of choice for Fighting game events such as Evo, that gives the PS4 extra appeal. ‘For The Players’, the current ethos of Sony, Street Fighter V fits into that ethos perfectly, and potentially opens up opportunities for plenty of tournaments and events. As for Street Fighter V it’s self, the gameplay trailer looks utterly fantastic. The sheer vibrancy on screen gives of a genuine sense of progression and evolution. It’s hard to judge a game based off 1 minute and 29 seconds of footage, but by god did Capcom mange to craft a trailer that got the hype train rolling. It’ll be interesting to see what Street Fighter V ships with. Hopefully none of Capcom’s shady practices of on disc DLC will rear it’s ugly head. With the streaming capability of the PS4, it’s fair the expect a fully fledged spectator mode, making the game perfect for day one community based tournaments. Details will trustingly follow once the dust settles, but the hype has undoubtedly started, and Sony adds another big game to their arsenal.    ...

Game of Thrones Episode One: Iron From Ice Review (PS4/XB1/PC)

Game of Thrones Episode One: Iron From Ice Review (PS4/XB1/PC)

Telltale have seemingly continued their blitz on 2014 with their fourth licensed game of the year. After their successful runs with The Walking Dead, Borderlands and The Wolf Among Us, Telltale have released their take on Game of Thrones, possibly their biggest challenge to date. Based on the TV show, which in turn is based on a series of fantasy novels called A Song of Ice and Fire, Game of Thrones has been exciting the masses since it’s announcement. The concept of Telltale creating a brand new story in such a beloved universe was mouth watering. The game is set around House Forrester, a house never mentioned in the show (as of yet) and only scarcely in the books, banner men to House Stark. The first episode picks up in line with the infamous red wedding and creates a expanded narrative centering around the impact of the event. The bulk of the plot revolves around establishing Forrester history and traditions, while introducing the key players in and around the house.   Given the scope of Game of Thrones, this title feels less focused than past Telltale games. Players aren’t put into the shoes of one character, instead they are thrown between multiple characters, all with interweaving stories. The lack of focus on one character allows the game the feel fresh when compared to past Telltale titles. Playing numerous characters gives the player more freedom and creativity in how they wish to approach situations. It’s a change that make sense given the size of the Game of Thrones universe, but it’s also a change that makes the whole experience less safe, given any character is at risk of death. Having the ability to play around with different characters, choosing how they react to various conversations and events, opens up a whole new element not seen in past Telltale games. Switching between playing a character with a edge of brashness to a character just trying to get by keeps the games momentum going. At no point is there a wall where things feel slow or dragged out, Telltale have nailed the pace of game, drawing everything together in a neat bundle. The way in which the games events are tied into the show gives the whole experience a sense of legitimacy. Familiar faces make appearances throughout the game and never feel forced in for simple fan service. Each scene, each character, each action all have a point, there’s never a second that feels wasted. The only real issue with Telltale’s Game of Thrones is the presentation. The ‘painting’ art style does not lend it’s self well to the game. Environments tend to look a bit dull and lacking detail, character models range from adequate to slightly ugly. Sub bar visuals are accompanied by some truly horrific animation. Characters have a tendency to move their heads in robotic manners, detracting from the voice acting and taking the player out of the moment. It’s a niggling issue that becomes a frustration towards the end, even more so given most of this episode is long conversations. It’s hard to look past the awful animation when the voice acting of characters from the show (all voiced by the original actors) is so spot on. The dialogue is delivered in the exact way you’d hear it on the show, but the dead pan robotic character models distraught the quality acting. Visual issues aside, Game of Thrones Episode One: Iron From Ice is a fantastic start to the series. The new characters are all compelling, the overall plot remains unique while relevant to the source material, and the twists and turns the show (as well as Telltale) are know for are all present. There’s at least one scene that will genuinely surprise players, forcing them to see this series as a whole new ball game compared to past Telltale games. Fans of the show will undoubtedly appreciate the authenticity found within the game. It’s hard not to recommend the game given it’s quality and it’s low asking price of £5....

The Evil Within – Modern Horror Fails To Scare

The Evil Within – Modern Horror Fails To Scare

The Evil Within has described by a number of sites as ‘terrifying’. A game that shakes the player to the core with fear, a true horror title…yet from what I’ve played it’s not even slightly unnerving. If there’s one thing The Evil Within does well, it’s represent the state of modern horror. ‘LOOK AT THIS, IT’S VILE!!’ seems be the games theme. Gore, gore and more gore. Gore is not scary, sure it’s a little jarring at first, but it’s never scary. The Evil Within leans onto gore far too much, and the horror is lost in a shade of pink mist. Disgusting imagery, blood covered visuals, this is not fear inducing. The best horror video games (and films) work for their scares. Tension, atmosphere, a sense of dread, all of this is crafted and earned. The Evil Within reeks of a game trying too hard to scare. While the scenery and Imagery does unnerve, the rushed attempts to scare cheapen the overall product. There’s a difference between fear and panic, the latter is mostly the emotion felt throughout the game. Does this make the Evil Within a bad game? No, of course not. While the desired scares are not present, the game still provides a pretty loose horror feel. The problem is, The Evil Within has been marketed as a scary experience. The target audience has already seen everything The Evil Within has to offer, right down to the last drop of blood. Heck anyone who played Dead Space 1 & 2 has seen everything The Evil Within has to offer, repetitive events are not scary, just predicable. The lack of consequences attached to the main character is also a major con. Not being truly attached to a sense of reality within the game results in death feeling rather trivial. The fact the protagonist rarely questions anything, or even reacts for the most part, result in the game feeling rather hollow. The failure to scare may not be entirely down to the developers. Modern horror is far more of a spectacle, a much more rushed affair. Slow build ups are replaced with sharp musical score, people see everything, nothing is left to the imagination. While there is shock value, at least briefly, to modern horror, it’s hardly anything that truly scares. The best scares aren’t done visually, they’re done by going passed visuals and into the subconscious. A great example of modern scares is P.T. It may be brief, but it builds up tension, creates a atmosphere, suckers the player in and then starts to play with them. The Evil Within is still enjoyable, it’s just a shame it’s not the horrific experience it could have been. A example of modern horror and all that is wrong with it, nothing but spectacle. Times may change back to where horror becomes more of a result of craftsmanship rather than gore. For now, all we can do is wait, wait and support titles like Alien: Isolation that earns it’s scares.    ...

Destiny – A Few Minor Changes, For The Greater Good

Destiny – A Few Minor Changes, For The Greater Good

With sometime passing after Destiny’s launch, after many hours put into the game across various planets, strikes and loot caves, it seems like it’s a good time to reflect. Destiny may have a number of issues, chief of which being a lack of matchmaking and varied content, it’s time to focus on the smaller issues. These issues aren’t exactly major, but would improve the game enough to be worthy of mentioning. Destiny plays, sounds, and looks fantastic, but these are few changes I’d like to see just give the game that little extra quality.   And no, matchmaking will not be mentioned, it’s already been discussed here.     More varied Weapon Skins/Sounds -   While Exotics all look unique, and rightly so, the lesser quality items all look far too similar. It’s a truly minor gripe but it has a profound effect on the game visually. Getting your grubby hands on a Legendary just to see how similar it looks to a rare weapon is a little soul destroying, even more so when it’s a weapon earned via reputation and marks. The lack of variety in weapon sounds is also a nagging complaint. It would be nice to hear how heavy certain guns sound, listen to them bellow out proudly. These issues could easily be fixed as time goes on and more content/items are added, here’s to hoping that proves to be the case.   Clans -   Clans/guilds have long been a staple of multiplayer games, and Destiny includes them..kinda. Players can join clans by visiting Bungie’s site and signing up to clans via their pages. There is little to no clan business in the actual game bar the name appearing on the players banner. It’s a little confusing that a game with a focus on joining other players to tackles tasks has basically no clan options. Simply adding a list of clan members in the in-game menu would at least allow players to see whose online and what they are up to. The addition of in-game clan list would also help form fire teams, feeding into the social experience Destiny flirts with. A simple issue to fix, but it does beg the question why didn’t it ship with more in depth clan features.   Communication -   At the present moment, players are restricted to either dancing, pointing, saluting or sitting as a means to communicate in game. With no voice chat, or quick text, there’s no way to talk to other players within the game. Players often bump into each other in wild, they exchanges glances, awkwardly selecting a emote, and then they move on. A local proximity voice chat would be a welcome addition to the game. ‘Hey are you doing this mission/bounty? Want to party up?’ the game suddenly becomes a much more social experience instead of a lonely existence that happens to feature some voiceless faces. Not all players will want to voice chat, making the voice chat a opt in/out option would be a safe bet to keep everyone happy.   No More Defending Ghosts -   Destiny plays extremely well, it’s gameplay is on point. The problem is, the mission structure does very little to make the most of the silky smooth gameplay. From the first hour till the 200th hour, players are sent to go to a object and deploy their Ghost, every time. It would be nice to have some variation put into the missions, be it story or patrol. While shooting waves upon waves of enemies is fun to start off with, after all new guns freshen it up, it becomes a little dragged out after a while. This is another issues that will probably be fixed with the expansions. It’s hard to see Bungie coming out with two new batches of content all featuring the same mission structure, or at least one would hope so.   Let Me Know More About Me -   The character page is a little lacking. While it looks nice and neat, the lack displayed stats and faction reputation is a little bit irritating. Destiny features a strong focus on grinding in it’s end game, be it reputation or marks. It boggles the mind why a player’s current reputation with a faction is not displayed in the menus. The act of flying back to the tower just to see your reputation becomes extremely drawn out. Instead of players finding out their reputation at vendors, put it on their character sheets, add it as a experience bar. It’s a quality of life addition that makes it a lot more easier to plot faction progression.   Customization -   Amour, sparrows, space ships, weapons, the players closest friends in Destiny. While this is mostly a wish rather than a realistic change, more customization options would be brilliant. From my experience, a lot of players are starting to look the same. There’s only so many times you can see the same helmet and armor combinations before thinking it’s a uniform. The ability to customize amour (beyond shaders) would be a nifty little touch. Adding marks to armor, showcasing that players experiences and achievements, seems like a no brainier. Changing up the visual looks of ship and sparrows would also be a welcomed addition. Beat Vault of Glass? Why not show off the fact by adding a design or trophy onto the ship/sparrow?      ...

Shadow Of Mordor’s Nemesis System Is A Game Changer

Shadow Of Mordor’s Nemesis System Is A Game Changer

Death has become a little bit of a joke in most modern video games. Quick saves, lacking of challenge, the threat and consequences of death are simply not taken into account any more. Sure there’s rare cases of death being seen as a threat in the likes of Dark Souls, Zombie U and Alien: Isolation, but they don’t effect the game world. The concept of the players death effecting the game world is intriguing, this is where Shadow of Mordor comes in. Death is simply a event, it’s a game changer. The Nemesis system gives the act of dying a sense of real impact, the game is getting harder, the enemies are becoming tougher, death has genuine consequences. Being slain by a enemy, seeing that enemy earn a promotion for the kill, becoming more powerful, it’s a oddly giddy experience. There’s a morbid curiosity to witnessing how the players death affects the game world.   The Nemesis system install a organic sense to Shadow of Mordor, almost to the point where it feels like a reactive world. The player simply isn’t there to interact with their surroundings, they’re there as part of a progressing universe, a cog in the system. The fact enemies can grow and improve by killing the player, gives each battle a sense of risk, making it a much more intense experience. In the grand scheme of the Nemesis system doesn’t just focus on the player. There’s a deep rooted civil war that sees the game in a constant state of change. Taking out a captain open ups a gap for a new captain. When the player is killed, a new captain is created who in turn brings his friends into the other vacant roles. This kicks off a chain reaction or power struggles and recruitment attempts, a truly organic system changing the games world. The players death is always a huge event in the game, and the knock on effect can be felt for hours of in-game time.   Shadow of Mordor should be praised to the high heavens having such a brilliantly devilish system at it’s core. It’s rare that modern video games tries something truly new, something truly game changing. Similar systems could easily be put to use in other genres, such as sports and racing games. The concept of a rival remembering the player, improving from their last encounter, is mouth watering. The Nemesis system could usher in a new bloodline of video games where the worlds feel more organic and reactionary. Here’s to hoping that this is the first step into a whole new video game world....

Destiny – The Lack of Matchmaking Is Inexcusable

Destiny – The Lack of Matchmaking Is Inexcusable

There’s nothing worse than seeing a well respected developer lower their standards and begin to produce poor, half finished, products. It’s always easy to pick up on a half arsed effort in any form of media be it music, film or video games. Bungie were once known for producing quality video games, technically accomplished, well rounded, pure quality. Bungie’s fantastic run has been whole heartily brought to end with the release of Destiny, a true example of what happens when you pump big bucks into a game and rush it out to meet a pre-holiday release window. Destiny has been a huge commercial success, this does not reflect the games quality however. Bungie spent a long time promising the world to it’s fans. Explore a rich world, play how you want when you want, a brand new experience that combines the staples of Bungie with MMO themes. What we got was half a game missing a number of key features…and not many people seemed fussed…and that’s worrying. Destiny, in it’s current state, is a free-to-play experience covered in big budget productions. The lack of story, the lack of content, the lack of balance, the lack of basic quality of life features, it’s genuinely disgusting to see mostly online game released like this. The fact that a good chunk of the end game is locked due to the lack of online match making is pretty dire. Would we forgive this in other games from lesser known developers? Hell no. The main problem with Destiny is it feels utterly unfinished and untested. The lack of content is a huge elephant in the room. ‘You can do heroic strikes and raids!’ while this is the true, the fact heroic strikes and raids are only accessible with a group of friends, this content instantly becomes unplayable by large a number of players. The end game is essentially locked away without putting a decent amount of effort into crawling around message boards looking for players (given there’s no voice/text chat in the game player hub ‘The Tower’, a little like a MMO released decades ago. The lack of content is indeed a issue, but the fact some of this content is not realistically playable due to lack of matchmaking feels whole heartily sloppy, perhaps even lazy, on Bungie’s behalf. It’s depressingly hilarious that a game with a budget of over $300 million, and a focus on online/social interaction, ships with zero matchmaking for it’s endgame. It makes the game feel rushed, unfinished. Get the game out, make the money, sort the issues out later…this is does not feel like the Bungie people became fans of. Destiny, as a whole, is full of issues and problems that suggested the Alpha/Betas were purely for PR/Marketing reasons. The lack of balance between classes in PvP, the loot table, bugged bounties, the excessive grinding. These issues can all be overlooked for now, but a lack of matchmaking is truly inexcusable.  ...

Phil Fish Wants You To Hate him

Phil Fish Wants You To Hate him

Fez was decent, least I thought it was, at it’s heart it was a fun title that made me feel kinda happy. Fez was colorful, slick, enjoyable and consistent. I enjoyed the game and looked back at it as pleasant experience. After all was said and done, I decided to look into the games development and see how it was crated, this resulted in me finding one Phil Fish. A talent young man, there is no doubt, but a egoistical fella. There’s nothing wrong with ego, look throughout creative media, sports and various other purists, a lot of the best people have a ego. The problem with Phil Fish is…he seems to think the world owes him something, he seems to think I owe him something and that you owe him something. Phil Fish isn’t a person, but a person consumed by a character.   I came to this conclusion after watching ‘Indie Game: The Movie’, a lovely little number that shed light on the hardships, struggles and high points of creating a vision. While everyone featured in the film seemed genuine, real, Mr.Fish always seemed like he was ‘playing’ for the camera. As time went on, and his twitter account became more and more active, it seemed like Mr.Fish had turned heel, full heel. Why do I use a term generally used in relation to professional wrestling? It’s simple, Phil Fish is acting like a WWE wrestler, a poor man’s CM Punk. The way in which he interacts with people over social media, his trash talk of his peers, the way in which he reacts to criticism, it all screams ‘playing a character’. I’ve always wondered why he acts like this, my only real conclusion is bad press is better than no press. In running his mouth, slagging off his peers, going overboard on current events, he earns himself a lot of heat which in turn gives him a lot of press. Phil Fish could announce any game he likes at this point and the internet would be all over it, social media (within video game circles) would be buzzing. Even when he’s not working on projects he stays in the news, he’s playing the system. Ethically, his recent exploits are a little dark. Requesting civil war and insulting his fan base seem like awful moves, but given he’s turned Heel, it’s a easy way to get gain heat. Phil Fish wants you to hate him, he thrives on it, he works lives on it. While you could argue it’s a clever means to stay relevant, the whole concept cheapens the joys that Fez brought. The whimsical charms of Fez feel slightly corrupted when you take into account the attitude of it’s creator. The real shame is Fish is super talented, and truly talented people don’t come along too often. His obsession with trying to play the bad guy is his main obstacle. There’s a hope that maybe one day he’ll change his focus, he’ll stop playing the villain, but that doesn’t seem likely. Phil Fish wants you to hate him, and he loves you for doing so....

P.T – A Word of Mouth Success

P.T – A Word of Mouth Success

The popularity of P.T has made me sit back and change my views on a few things. Demos have became a rarity in the modern market, hype sells and thus the big games have no need for a demo. Heck, even the smaller games tend to release without demos, they’ve became a thing of the past. In place of demos, we now have early access, alpha/beta tests and marketing…this is why P.T intrigues me. P.T is part demo, part marketing…a playable piece of marketing…and that’s fantastic. Word mouth of works wonders, and P.T has been doing the rounds as soon as it hit PSN. Given P.T’s length, content and hidden puzzles, it’s perfect to recommend to someone, even if it’s purely to try scare the hell out of them. When people hear how terrifying a game is, they often want to test it out, see if it’s as scary as people say. P.T’s simplicity opens it up to the masses, anyone can play it regardless of skill level or knowledge on what the game is. P.T goes beyond being a demo, the manner in which it popped out of no where, the way it captured peoples attention, it’s a similar impact to that of the original Flash game Slender. Sure it may have some major names behind it, sure it’s part of a major franchise, but it’s the perfect PR move for a franchise that’s been rather out of date for some years. Silent Hill has struggled for sometime now, while Downpour may not of been awful, Homcoming was just ‘okay’ and the Wii titles went under the radar, the franchise on the whole is stale. Announcing a new Silent Hill title wouldn’t of made much of a impact, but with big names such as Kojima behind it…things go up a notch, and P.T took things even further. Given how many variables exist within P.T, and how many things can go unseen on initial playthroughs, people banded together and began to discuss various things they had figured out or differences during their playthroughs. This was yet another means in which P.T became almost viral, it created a active community for a game just announced, bringing a potential base of buyers already.   While Demos may of became a less popular option for bigger games and names, P.T proves there’s still a foundation to be built upon. While it’s unclear how much of a representation P.T is for the final product (one assumes it won’t truly mirror the final release in most ways), the buzz it’s already crated for the game is staggering. A true triumph in using a kinda demo, kinda marketing tool, to inflate hype for a franchise essentially dead in the water.  ...

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