Video Games / Platform

Bethesda Goes Big At E3, Doom Emerges As Potential Game Changer

Bethesda Goes Big At E3, Doom Emerges As Potential Game Changer

It’s beautiful, it’s gorey, it’s Doom. The gameplay shown was pretty much exactly what most die hard Doom fans wanted. It’s literally a jaunt through various corridors making a utter mess of the various hell spawn the Marine encounters. Gun porn was also included, as too was some cheerful chainsaw footage. It started violently, and ended violently. Doom, much like the original, is a complete package. Single player, old school multiplayer (power ups, rocket jumps, no dial up internet), editing tools. This is a modern Doom in every sense. Snapmap could the difference between the game being a flash in the pan, or online power house. Doom showing closed with a showing of Hell, it’s as grim as you’d expect. The smoke effects seemingly went unappreciated, but they do set off the environment perfectly. Overall, Doom maintains it’s classic DNA, while splicing it with modern day features and more open levels. Personally, I find Doom to be a much more interesting prospect than most other games we’re aware of. One slight concern, Doom’s old school approach may be jarring for the modern day console player. They’ve come to expect cinematic story driven games, blitzed with QTAs and cut scenes. Doom says ‘fuck that’ and throws you a shotgun. Battlecry is one of those games that has never truly felt like it’s doing anything ‘big’. There’s still questions over exactly what it is, even with a decent amount footage being out in the wild. It’s going into world wide Beta, it still looks like it could be fun, but nothing that’ll set the world alight…even more so given competition in the same space. Dishonest 2′s big reveal was ruined after they ‘accidentally’ mentioned it during a stream that was ‘accidentally’ broadcast. In truth, Dishonored feels like it came out years ago. With the Thief franchise all but dead, Dishonored fills the gap nicely. One of the new leads is a female, so Polygon will surely be creaming themselves before ranting about the character not being conflicted enough about her gender/sexuality. The penis bearing character option still exists, so don’t worry. Elder Scrolls Online takes front and center. It’s boring, as in truly boring. Think of all those MMORPGs that came out in 2001-2002 that had no quality of life features, awful questing mechanics and no real reason to party up for the most part, that’s Elder Scrolls Online. The flower picking system is good however. But brutal honesty aside, it’s a decent enough experience now it’s gone free to play, but there’s much better on offer in terms of MMOS both on PC and console. Elder Scrolls Card game (Legends), because you know, Hearthstone and Magic The Gathering are making card combat ‘cool’ again. Hard to see them knocking off Hearthstone from the Card Combat throne, but what ever, the more the merrier. Fallout 4, the game we all knew was coming (at some point), then all acted surprised when it was announced. Even after the years of wanting Fallout 4 to be real, people still moaned when it became reality. Concept art was shown, there was a ghoul pirate which looked pretty radical (get it? RADical?). Fallout 4 goes into the unexplored Pre-war, which feels a little off , mainly due to the showed content feeling like fan service. The complaints about the visuals some people had come off even more silly, Fallout 4 looks beautiful, the art style fits the tone perfectly. All the characters are fully voiced, with dynamic dialogue. Pip Boy is all fancy, mini games, holotapes, 3rd renders of items, it’s like the Iwatch with a actual point. There’s a collectors which will no doubt sell-out, and be sold on e-bay for five times the RRP. Fallout Shelter, a mobile game for people who love the Sims, love Fallout, and cramp riddled necks. Micromanagement with a Fallout twist. It’s free, no pay wall, no internet connections, it’s almost like free-to-play actually exists. The most interesting feature of Fallout 4 is the ‘re-building’ feature. The player can build settlements, which attract other NPCs to live in, which in turn increases the size of the settlement. Build defences, market stalls, caravans. This is how you add infinite replay value. The crafting systems scope carries over to weapon customization, the sheer amount of options at hand is staggering. Power armor is fully customizable, it’s almost like Bethesda want you to give up your social life…and job. Fallout 4 looks like the next step in the franchise, genuine progression for the series, and the industry. If the Devil is in the detail, Bethesda are covered in virgin blood and blasting out Swedish death metal. The release date is this November, but there’s always a hint of cynicism when it comes to release dates and E3.     So Bethesda started off the E3 showings with a bang. Doom is setting up to be the dark horse of their line up. The gameplay won’t be to everyone’s taste (history shows this on consoles) but the Snapmap feature could place Doom as a long term success, and not just a flavor of the month. Fallout 4 is Fallout 4, it’s going to sell well, the hype is already there, people want it. The scope of the game is insane, the release date is still a little suspect but either way, it’s Fallout 4. Dishonored 2 was only shown in trailer form, and it’s oddly went under the radar across social media. The market needs Dishonored 2, the lack of stealth games is hugely apparent, and the recent demise of the Thief franchise has left the door open for Dishonored 2 to take it’s seat of power. Bethseda paced their showing perfectly, moving from game to game. They gave facts, and not promises, smaller reveals were covered quickly and precisely, never out staying their welcome. Fallout 4 will obviously be the game on everyone’s lips, but Doom is the game to watch, purely down to Snapmap, that feature could change the console scene for the better.                ...

Splatoon’s Main Problem Is Amiibo

Splatoon’s Main Problem Is Amiibo

Splatoon is great, it’s a triumph in almost every sense…but there’s one nagging issue. Every time I boot up the game I’m treated to a instant reminder of this issue, it’s always there, it can’t be avoided. Who would of guessed a piece of plastic would be the only fault Splatoon truly suffers from, them god damn Amiibo. While Amiibo’s are merely a novelty in other games, Splatoon treats them with more respect, perhaps too much respect. The three Splatoon Amiibo’s unlock challenges, which in turn unlock items. These items just so happen to be some of the best items in the game, and not just cosmetically. The way in which clothing works in Splatoon affects the gameplay resulting in the Amiibo awards feeling a little irritating.   Each item of clothing carries a perk, enhancing a certain aspect of a characters abilities. The higher tier items offer four perks, the Amiibo gear falls into this tier. Looking past the fact the items look far better than anything else In the game, the advantage they give players early on is annoying, and unfair. Having content that is only unlocked by purchasing ‘other’ items outside of the core game, be it DLC or related promotions (Mass Effect/ Dr.pepper promo for example) is nothing new, but the Amiibos are a different beast. What started out as a nice collectible, with some extra uses within certain games, has now become a bit of a farce. Amiibo are the modern day version of Cabbage Patch Kids/Thunderbirds, stock is low yet demand is high, really high. Each wave of Amiibo always has at least two Amiibo everyone wants, yet no one can find. People invest into the supply and demand culture, selling the rarer Amiibos for double/triple the price they paid for them. To make matters worse, even the stores are starting to scalp. GAME increased their prices from £10.99 to £15.99, Shopto went one step further by going from £10.99 all the way to £19.99. The Splatoon Amiibos were initially tricky to get a hold of, but recently the boy and girl inkling have became quite common…but the Squid is a whole different story. Sold as part of a bundle with the core game, the Squid Amiibo is a tricky thing to track down outside out e-bay. Content is essentially out of reach, all down to a piece of plastic. As a collector of Amiibo, even if I refuse to take them out the box, I can still see the issues. I may own all of the Amiibo released in Europe at the moment, but I can sympathise with people who just can’t get their hands on certain Amiibo, the Squid included. Having content tucked behind a pay wall is awful sin of modern gaming, but trapping it behind a pay wall that’s also a effort to obtain, that’s inexcusable. As much as I love Nintendo, their implementation of Amiibo in Splatoon is worrying. For years now Nintendo has generally stayed away from the dirty business practices other big names indulge in. Buying a Nintendo game has always meant getting a full, complete, video game in your hand. Splatoon, and it’s Amiibo support, bucks the trend and creates a small shroud of doubt. Hopefully Nintendo does not continue to go down this path, or at least doesn’t hide too much content behind their Amiibo line. It’s a shame the main fault of Splatoon is partly due to Nintendo’s newest success story.      ...

(PC) Kholat | Review

(PC) Kholat | Review

Kholat is a horror game developed by IMGN.PRO. The game is based on the true-event known as the Dyatlov Pass Incident (click the link if you want to know more about said incident). In Kholat players take on the role of some person walking through the mountains and collecting notes and avoiding some teleporting/slow-moving entity (very similar to Slender) all while being narrated by the ever-famous, man who always dies, Sean Bean. The notes you are collecting are supposed to reveal the story and events around the Dyatlov Pass Incident but there really doesn’t seem to be much of a story present in Kholat and it feels more like the developers didn’t exactly know what they were doing and decided to just adopt the tired, and stale Slender formula we’ve been seeing in indie-horror titles as of late, which is a huge bummer coming from Kholat. Basing a game around the events of the Dyatlov Pass Incident should be a solid premise, and make an amazing horror game but that doesn’t exactly happen when you dip into Kholat. Instead you get a pretty boring, and frustrating game that feels like a chore to progress through, and doesn’t offer much in terms of excitement or enjoyment. You’re thrown into an ‘open-world’ environment that looks gorgeous, I won’t deny that. Kholat is one damn good looking game, thanks to Unreal Engine 4 and the amazing environmental work that was done on the game. The mountains look foreboding, and unnerving especially when I came across two giant skulls carved into the face of a cliff. Sadly, that’s about all that Kholat really offers in term of a horror experience. Through-out my time spent with the game I really only found myself feeling creeped out by certain parts of the environment. The enemies weren’t exactly terrifying, and were more so frustrating, or downright annoying to deal with. They work pretty similar to how Slenderman works. A slow-moving, possible teleporting (it seems like they can teleport in front of you which is downright annoying) entity that stalks you the entire time while you collect notes. Seem familiar? That’s the core concept of Kholat in a nut-shell. Explore a creepy environment, collect notes, and avoid the entity that is stalking you. Even the entity seems to be confused during the game as well. I often found myself watching the entity stop chasing me and just stand still, or change direction and start walking away from me. Where’s the fear in that? And you’re most likely to be killed by the environment, which offers no sort of warning when you could die. It’s more like a random, gotcha sort of incident which is horrible. Kholat doesn’t exactly bring anything fresh, or new to the table in terms of an experience, which again is a bummer considering how good Kholat could of been. The game also allows you to fast-travel at campsites that you discover which is a glorious feature that I’m glad was implemented due to how agonizing, and boring it is to traverse the environment after a while. This mainly stems from doing a ton of backtracking, and walking in circles. Then again, this could be intentional due to the disorienting environment and this could possible be what the victims of the real-life incident felt before their untimely demise. Sadly, it doesn’t work and just makes the game boring and again, feel like more of a chore to play. That and the entire movement system in the game is pretty godawful. You can sprint for what is maybe a few seconds before tiring out and moving at an extremely sluggish pace and it takes a fair bit of time to be able to sprint again. It makes the moments where you need to run-away from the entities, and the “orange fog” that tends to chase you to be frustrating. It feels like this was intended to make players feel tense and scared but all I felt was severe annoyance, which isn’t a good thing. You want players to have fun, and feel terrified. Not annoyed, and angry at poorly designed mechanics. I’ve only put around 3 hours into Kholat and I can tell I’m nearing the end-game area. The story seems to be expanding, but is still extremely convoluted with no real direction. What am I doing in the mountain? Why did I decide to come here? Who the hell are these entities walking around? The game offers really no explanation for anything, and even Sean Bean seems like he didn’t want to be there, and maybe even he too was confused by the entire ordeal. In the end, would I recommend Kholat? That depends. At $21.99 (currently on sale for $19.79) I wouldn’t. Maybe if the game were to drop to around $10 I’d be happy telling people to pick it up, but I don’t feel comfortable recommending a bare and a non-enjoyable experience like this for that kind of a price-point. Kholat had a solid premise, and some unique concepts but it sort of failed to deliver. It has amazing visuals, and the setting is great but it really just falls flat on delivery. Pros Awesome setting, and based off of a spooky real-life event with the Dyatlov Pass Incident. Gorgeous visuals, and at times can feel really uneasy while traversing through the snow-ridden, blizzard like environments. Sandbox-ish? Cons Not much meat to the game. More of a Slender clone by walking around, gathering notes, and avoiding some slow-walking/teleporting entity. Sean Bean’s narration feels a tad phoned in. The story is extremely convoluted, and the game doesn’t really have any sense of direction. The game is more frustrating then it is fun. The deaths you experience are more so random, and put on a more luck-based feel. Maybe you’ll randomly get killed by the environment with no warning. Doesn’t exactly feel like a horror game, and more so feels like an adventure narrative sort of experience in the veins of Dear Esther. Sadly, Kholat just isn’t all that great of a game and for that price-point I’d recommend you check it out if it gets a price drop. I was really excited for Kholat as I’m super into the Dyatlov Pass Incident, but the game didn’t fully utilize what it could of with these events and sort of just falls flat.      ...

Fresh, Fun, Pure Nintendo – Splatoon Review

Fresh, Fun, Pure Nintendo – Splatoon Review

Nintendo isn’t exactly known for creating all new properties. Often relying on their classic cast of characters, Nintendo like to experiment with new games and genres, but always front their games with the likes of Mario and Link. Splatoon marks a break through moment for Nintendo, and indeed the Wii U, as their first completely original release in some time. Splatoon is typically Nintendo in tone, yet a whole new adventure for the industry veterans. At it’s core, Splatoon is third-person shooter that tips the industry standard on it’s head. Only Nintendo could take a concept known for it’s focus on kills and turn it into a exercise of innocent fun. The real success of Splatoon is not what is, but what it does.   The 4 v 4 team based action on offer is far from the expected standard fair. Teams battle it out to cover the map in their respective teams ink colours with various weapons and gadgets. While other games focus on racking up kills, Splatoon frolics around encouraging players indulge in the simple act of mass vandalism. Complete with a interactive player city hub, Splatoon feels extremely old school, but with all of the modern flare. If there’s one thing that could have killed off Spaltoon early on it would be the controls. Motion controls still carry a stigma to theme, even more so when it’s a vital element to the gameplay. The way in which the Wii U’s motion controls are utilized is such a smart, subtle, and none-intrusive manner that it easy to forget they’re even there. Player directional movement is dictated with the Wii U pad’s analogue sticks, while the aiming is exclusively controlled via motion controls. Initially, aiming is fiddly, but quickly becomes second nature. The camera can be re-centered with a simple push of a button, a hugely important feature that oils the motion controls resulting in the whole scheme feeling like a genuine victory for the Wii U’s pad.   Splatoon’s lack of class roles is a true deviation from the modern standard, but it’s a deviation that suits the game perfectly. Players, after creating their ‘kid’, can purchase clothing and weapons that affect how they play. The play style of each weapon is where Splatoon’s true depth can be found. The distinct difference between the tools on offer is what keeps each session feeling fresh, even more so with certain maps encouraging the use of mixture of weapons. They all have their trades off, they all have their advantages and counters, for a ‘kids’ game Splatoon has a true hidden depth. Players can further customization their play style by purchasing items of clothing, all of which come with various perks. Each item is rated in terms of it’s quality on a four star scale. For every star the items posses, there’s a perk to unlock. The perks range from the likes of damage increases, speed boosts and reduced spawn times. Saving up the coin in order to buy both weapons and clothing forms the spine of the replay value. Battling through a number of games, earning the coins, buying the items, leveling the items, it’s a constant cycle that rewards.   With a number of big budget ‘Triple A’ games trying to redefine online shooters, it’s bizarre that Nintendo’s first attempt is so simple, yet so successful. The primary goal of Splatoon is to cover each map in your teams coloured ink. This is achieved by spraying said ink all over the environment, or by ‘splatting’ opposition team members (it feels wrong to call them enemies). The ink it’s self is not merely a means to victory, it’s also a unique method of transport and strategic resource. Splatoon’s main selling point is the way in which players can switch between a humanoid kid into a squid, allowing them to dive into the ink splattered around the environment. While it may sound like a cheesy gimmick, it’s actually a slick mechanic that opens up a tactical edge to player movement. It’s a genuinely smart feature that Splatoon makes perfect use of, enhancing the core gameplay tenfold. Firing ink up the wall, turning into a squid, and swimming up the wall to reach a advantage point produces undeniable giddy moments. Nintendo’s lack of experience with team based competitive shooters does show in places. The recently added ‘Ranked Mode’ features a game mode similar to King of the Hill in which player battle to control a point on the map. Some of the weapons and gadgets become far more useful than others, resulting in the game being all about who has the most rollers or sprinklers. Given players can’t change their loadout mid game, there’s a certain element of luck attached to Ranked mode that detracts from the sense of ‘free flowing’ fun. The mode it’s self is fair, but is inconsistent depending on the map it’s hosted on. Splatoon’s most surprising feature is it’s short, but sweet, single player experience. Beneath the player city hub, the five single player zones can be found. Each zone offers a number of challenges along with a final boss battle. The challenges mostly consist of using the Squid/Ink mechanic in various clever fashions. It may only be a brief distraction, but the single player portion is genuinely enjoyable, even if it does result in a longing for more. By the time the single player comes to a close, new items are unlocked and fun time is had, it begs the question of what else could be achieved if Nintendo spent more time on the singe player aspect.   All the hallmarks of Nintendo can be seen and heard in Splatoon’s visuals and soundtrack. The bright environments, the beautifully adorable character models, the oddly engaging music, it’s all typically Nintendo. The Wii U isn’t known for it’s power, but it’s more than capable of looking beautiful, and when the ink is flying, and the squids are leaping, it’s hard not to enjoy the visual splendor on display. Nintendo’s bold has paid off, they’ve created a wonderfully solid game with plenty of room to grow. The staggered release of DLC is good idea, allowing players to come to terms with how Splatoon works and plays. The simple nature of Splatoon is what separates it from other games in the same space. The core gameplay elements, the impressive player ink/squid mechanic, the sheer joy on offer, it all result in Splatoon being such an appealing experience. The only true sour note is the fact the Amiibos unlock high end gear and more single player challenges, which is annoying given the current state of Amiibo availability. It’s not a huge problem, but it’s still a niggling annoyance.   Bold, bright, fresh, enjoyable, Splatoon proves you can teach a old dog new tricks.   8/10      ...

The Best So Far, But Not Yet Great – Game of Thrones Ep4: Sons of Winter Review

The Best So Far, But Not Yet Great – Game of Thrones Ep4: Sons of Winter Review

TellTale’s Game of Thrones series has been their weakest work since Jurassic Park, but there’s always been a since of hidden potential just waiting to burst through. The firs three episodes have plodded around, often looking for a real direction, with the intention of setting the pieces into places. Episode four, Sons of Winter, marks a turning point for the series, welcoming back TellTale’s ability to tell a story while engrossing the player, but it’s not without it’s faults. By the time Sons of Winter rolls around, the core cast of characters all have their defined goals, traits and ideals. Each story arc has a distinct tone in keeping with themes often covered in both the books and the TV show. Family values, honour, responsibility, tradition all continue to play key parts in each respective character’s story. The theme of revenge remains prevalent throughout Sons of Winter, only this time it comes into conflict with the concept of a ‘the greater good’. Sons of Winter is much more direct episode in the series, with the action coming at a steady pace. The constant small talk of the previous episodes is replaced with action scenes and plot progressing interactions. This new found flow allows the episode to feel much more compact, never allowing the player to settle into a lulled sense disenchantment. The storyline around the Forrester/Whitehall stand off benefits most of the change of pace, becoming a much more engrossing tale. The conversations between key characters carries much more weight than initial episodes. The lack of small talk frees characters, allowing them to command a presence in their respective scenes. Both Mira and Rodrik Forrester’s once staggered stories are now a interesting mix of political intrigue and intense tension. Rodrik in particular shines thanks to a number of intense stand offs and decisions. Mira’s section is a much more subtle affair, akin to her character. Her weapons are not physical, but verbal, as she adopts to the game of lies played across Kings Landing.   Asher plays a pivotal part in Sons of Winter, presenting some genuinely interesting back-story and filler during events shown in the TV series. His continued tale of avenging his family leads him to running into Daenerys Targaryen on the even of her conquest of Meereen. While the TV series featured the outcome of her conquest, Sons of Winter shows the beginning with Asher and Beskha on the front line. The simmering tension between the two friends continues to boil, with Beskha growing increasingly frustrated with Asher’s willingness to obey others. The relationship between the two characters becomes to focal point for the episode, with one of them revealing some genuinely interesting back story. As ever, one story is sacrificed in terms of how much spot light they receive. Gared’s exploits at The Wall are significantly cut down, leaving his story to be left in the dust. His section mostly consists of quick time combat events, with one or two minor interactions in between. In truth, the Gared storyline was starting to lose it’s momentum during episode three, that momentum is essential dead by the close of Sons of Winter. Telltale have almost written themselves into failure with Gared’s quest to reach the grove. His story feels slightly hoakey when compared to the deadly game of wits and brawn present in the other Forester family tales. The main issues Sons of Winter suffers can be found in the shape of the inclusion of the Queen of Dragons. Her demeanor is jarringly hostile, nothing like her appearances in the TV series. Her inclusion in the episode feels slightly like fan service more than a means to drive the plot. Emilia Clarke’s wooden acting does not help things, but does suit the robotic nature of the character models. TellTale’s engine is seriously showing it’s age now, muddy textures, robotic animation and some utterly bizarre facial movements are the main issues to be found. Sons of Winter is easily the best of the bunch so far, suggesting the series is finally ready to hit it’s hot streak. Compact story telling, interesting revelations and some top notch pacing results in a hugely enjoyable experience. While the games are starting to look aged, the core elements all work together neatly. All of the pieces are in place, with three of the four stories at boiling point, episode five is already looking promising. Engaging, intense and utterly enjoyable, Sons of Winter is everything the last three episodes failed to be....

Why Ask For Female Led Games Only To Ignore them?

Why Ask For Female Led Games Only To Ignore them?

The last few years has seen a huge push for more female representation in video games. A number of video game journalists, pop culture critics (still not sure what that exactly entails) and industry figures demanded to see well rounded female characters leading video games. It’s a admirable stance, but the issue of practicing what you preach quickly reared it’s head. A small Brazilian indie developer, named Swordtale, recently released a game by the name of Toren, a puzzle adventure that explores gender roles and the concept of growing up. Toren was reviewed on this very site, and slated for it’s poor mechanics and dated gameplay…but not it’s attempts at exploring a female character. Toren’s main character is a young girl named Moonchild, her role throughout the game is the find her place in the world. Moonchild is neither objectified, sexualised or portrayed as weak. Moonchild, for all intents and purposes, is exactly what a number of people have been asking for…so why have they ignored the game? It’s hard to pin down exactly why Toren was ignored. Press releases were sent out, both big names and little names were offered review codes along with a link to the trailer. From the small site that is PixelGate.co.uk, to James Rolfe (The Angry Video Game Nerd), Toren’s PR did a good job of offering codes for review across the board. As they say, ignorance is bliss, and that certainly seems true in Toren’s case. For a game that provided what many were asking for, there sure wasn’t a whole lot of support from the people you’d expect. Toren may not be packing the ‘big’ names behind it, but Swordtale are undoubtedly contributing to the library of female led video games, a library not as small as some would have you believe. The method in which Toren explores it’s character is organic and well woven into the context of the story. There’s no misplaced attitude, no ‘issues’ that some people feel is a requirement for any female character. Moonchild’s journey from young child, to mature young women, happens before the players eyes in well crafted manner. Perhaps Toren wasn’t promoted in the right way. If Toren was thrown out into the public space and marketed as a game with the main selling point being a female lead, then perhaps social media would of buzzed with interest. Torren was marketed it as a video game, a video game with interesting themes and art style, and not just a vehicle for a female character. It’s a shame that a game like Toren fulfills the wishes of a vocal majority, yet receives barely any of their backing. Denying the scent of hypocrisy is a hard feat. When people are making a living off bemoaning the lack of female lead games on the market, should we really be shocked when they chose to ignore games like Toren?    ...

Bloodborne & Splatoon Prices Drop, Hard To Resist

Bloodborne & Splatoon Prices Drop, Hard To Resist

One of the finest video games in recent years has been given a healthy discount. From Software’s Bloodborne is now available for a mere £33.95. Given the quality, and the amount of content, £33.95 is a fine price. With the new generation of systems lacking ‘must play’ games, Bloodborne came about at the perfect time. Nintendo’s experimental title, Splatoon, is already being discounted. Gameseek has the standard version up for £22.50 when using the code SPREE5. The recent play tests resulted in a spike in pre-orders, a price drop would surely push Splatoon further towards the levels of success Nintendo may quietly be expecting. David Cage’s Beyond: Two Souls was the definition of a love/hate game. Left to rot in the bargain bin pretty early on, Beyond: Two Souls remains as one last gens curiosities. For £5 you’d be hard push to feel out of pocket, even if Ellen Page’s soulless performance kills your enthusiasm.  ...

Another Exclusive Remastering Is The Last Thing The Xbox One Needs

Another Exclusive Remastering Is The Last Thing The Xbox One Needs

The rumors have been floating around for some time now, but it seems Gears of War: Ultimate Edition is real. Microsoft’s Xbox One will play host to a new version of the classic 360 title, but is it really what Xbox One owners want to hear? Or even play? However way you spin it, both the PS4 and Xbox One have hardly got a exclusive games library truly worth boasting about. The scales have shifted towards the PS4 in recent times, mostly due to the brilliant Bloodborne, but there’s hardly a wealth of ‘killer apps’ on either system. The likes of Ryse & The Order 1886 failed to make a impact beyond looking pretty and Titanfall turned out to be a flash in the pan success. Killzone and Second Son were met with various amounts of success, but never truly felt like the ‘big’ titles many were expecting them to be. While Sony seem to taking steps in the right direction, Microsoft apparently see re-releases as path to success. The continued lean towards re-releases feels less of a safe option, especially after the utterly disastrous Master Chief Collection, which hurt the Halo brand. It’s undeniable that Gears of War is a franchise that carries a huge level of fan love with it, but the franchise took a few dents along the way. Bringing back Gears of War is not all that much of a issue, but the fact it would be seen as one of the Xbox One’s ‘big’ exclusives would present a whole new problem. Microsoft are still searching for a identity for their newest machine, supplying their system with regular exclusive remakes isn’t exactly the best way forward. If the Xbox One was to become known for it’s remakes, it’s easy to see the system falling behind it’s competition in the long run. Exclusives sells systems, but only the good ones positively define a system, and remaking past glories is not the way to build a systems legacy or user base. The Xbox One has the brand power, Microsoft’s hard work with pushing the 360 resulted in them becoming a household name in terms of consoles, and yet they seem to be struggling to replicate that success again. It’s not like the Xbox One has no exclusives coming, it’s more that they’re normally pushed aside and barely marketed or even talked about. The heavy focus on pushing The Master Chief Collection and timed Call of Duty DLC  as two of the main reasons to own a Xbox One was was fair enough, mostly due to the status of the franchises, but Gears doesn’t have that same power behind it. The chainsaw-chest high wall-shooter resonates with a large group of people, but it’s never been on the levels of Halo or Call of Duty, the Xbox One needs to resonate and interest and many people as it can. Gears of War on the Xbox One is a nice addition, but not a needed one, Microsoft need to give their system a identity, remastered Xbox 360 games is not the way to achieve that.     @linko64...

Super Smash Bros Gets Too Cheap To Resist

Super Smash Bros Gets Too Cheap To Resist

One of the main reasons to own a Wii U just got a whole lot cheaper. Super Smash Bros has been given welcomed discount resulting in a new copy costing a mere £24.99, or £22.99 pre-owned. The deal can be found at UK retailer Grainger Games. A new copy is probably more of a safe bet, mainly due to Grainger Games having a patchy track record when it comes to quality pre-owned games. For £24.99, you would be hard pressed to find a game as fun, and with as much re-play value, as Smash Bros....

Amiibo Prices Doubles, Are They Even Worth It?

Amiibo Prices Doubles, Are They Even Worth It?

As the Amiibo fever continues to spread, it seems even the retailers are starting to get in on the scalping action. ShopTo have decided to increase their prices to a sicking £19.99 per Amiibo, after months of being top dog in terms of value and service, at least for Amiibos. To put the price spike into perspective, Amiibo started of at £10.99 on Shopto, and remained at that price till about a month ago when they went up to £14.99. This price matched up with all other retailers, namely GAME. The further increase to £19.99 now makes ShopTo the most pricey option outside of E-bay and private sellers. ShopTo have yet to comment on why they have decided to raise their price in such a sharp manner. It’s interesting that all previous waves have now been desisted from their site. Is £20 per Amiibo too much to pay? Are retailers getting just as bad as scalpers? ShopTo certainly feel like they are.     - @linko64...

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