Video Games / Editorials

Why Ask For Female Led Games Only To Ignore them?

Why Ask For Female Led Games Only To Ignore them?

The last few years has seen a huge push for more female representation in video games. A number of video game journalists, pop culture critics (still not sure what that exactly entails) and industry figures demanded to see well rounded female characters leading video games. It’s a admirable stance, but the issue of practicing what you preach quickly reared it’s head. A small Brazilian indie developer, named Swordtale, recently released a game by the name of Toren, a puzzle adventure that explores gender roles and the concept of growing up. Toren was reviewed on this very site, and slated for it’s poor mechanics and dated gameplay…but not it’s attempts at exploring a female character. Toren’s main character is a young girl named Moonchild, her role throughout the game is the find her place in the world. Moonchild is neither objectified, sexualised or portrayed as weak. Moonchild, for all intents and purposes, is exactly what a number of people have been asking for…so why have they ignored the game? It’s hard to pin down exactly why Toren was ignored. Press releases were sent out, both big names and little names were offered review codes along with a link to the trailer. From the small site that is PixelGate.co.uk, to James Rolfe (The Angry Video Game Nerd), Toren’s PR did a good job of offering codes for review across the board. As they say, ignorance is bliss, and that certainly seems true in Toren’s case. For a game that provided what many were asking for, there sure wasn’t a whole lot of support from the people you’d expect. Toren may not be packing the ‘big’ names behind it, but Swordtale are undoubtedly contributing to the library of female led video games, a library not as small as some would have you believe. The method in which Toren explores it’s character is organic and well woven into the context of the story. There’s no misplaced attitude, no ‘issues’ that some people feel is a requirement for any female character. Moonchild’s journey from young child, to mature young women, happens before the players eyes in well crafted manner. Perhaps Toren wasn’t promoted in the right way. If Toren was thrown out into the public space and marketed as a game with the main selling point being a female lead, then perhaps social media would of buzzed with interest. Torren was marketed it as a video game, a video game with interesting themes and art style, and not just a vehicle for a female character. It’s a shame that a game like Toren fulfills the wishes of a vocal majority, yet receives barely any of their backing. Denying the scent of hypocrisy is a hard feat. When people are making a living off bemoaning the lack of female lead games on the market, should we really be shocked when they chose to ignore games like Toren?    ...

Another Exclusive Remastering Is The Last Thing The Xbox One Needs

Another Exclusive Remastering Is The Last Thing The Xbox One Needs

The rumors have been floating around for some time now, but it seems Gears of War: Ultimate Edition is real. Microsoft’s Xbox One will play host to a new version of the classic 360 title, but is it really what Xbox One owners want to hear? Or even play? However way you spin it, both the PS4 and Xbox One have hardly got a exclusive games library truly worth boasting about. The scales have shifted towards the PS4 in recent times, mostly due to the brilliant Bloodborne, but there’s hardly a wealth of ‘killer apps’ on either system. The likes of Ryse & The Order 1886 failed to make a impact beyond looking pretty and Titanfall turned out to be a flash in the pan success. Killzone and Second Son were met with various amounts of success, but never truly felt like the ‘big’ titles many were expecting them to be. While Sony seem to taking steps in the right direction, Microsoft apparently see re-releases as path to success. The continued lean towards re-releases feels less of a safe option, especially after the utterly disastrous Master Chief Collection, which hurt the Halo brand. It’s undeniable that Gears of War is a franchise that carries a huge level of fan love with it, but the franchise took a few dents along the way. Bringing back Gears of War is not all that much of a issue, but the fact it would be seen as one of the Xbox One’s ‘big’ exclusives would present a whole new problem. Microsoft are still searching for a identity for their newest machine, supplying their system with regular exclusive remakes isn’t exactly the best way forward. If the Xbox One was to become known for it’s remakes, it’s easy to see the system falling behind it’s competition in the long run. Exclusives sells systems, but only the good ones positively define a system, and remaking past glories is not the way to build a systems legacy or user base. The Xbox One has the brand power, Microsoft’s hard work with pushing the 360 resulted in them becoming a household name in terms of consoles, and yet they seem to be struggling to replicate that success again. It’s not like the Xbox One has no exclusives coming, it’s more that they’re normally pushed aside and barely marketed or even talked about. The heavy focus on pushing The Master Chief Collection and timed Call of Duty DLC  as two of the main reasons to own a Xbox One was was fair enough, mostly due to the status of the franchises, but Gears doesn’t have that same power behind it. The chainsaw-chest high wall-shooter resonates with a large group of people, but it’s never been on the levels of Halo or Call of Duty, the Xbox One needs to resonate and interest and many people as it can. Gears of War on the Xbox One is a nice addition, but not a needed one, Microsoft need to give their system a identity, remastered Xbox 360 games is not the way to achieve that.     @linko64...

Mortal Kombat X DLC Wishlist – Karts, Chess & Costumes

Mortal Kombat X DLC Wishlist – Karts, Chess & Costumes

Mortal Kombat X is currently sitting pretty as the ‘new gens’ best fighter. With a rather messy story, and some questionable micro-transactions, Mortal Kombat X is arguably the best of the series. Attention turns to how well Mortal Kombat x will be supported in terms of DLC, and with one pack already out, people have began to note their hopes for future content. The following is a list of content that would be more than welcome to Mortal Kombat X, from characters to mini-games, this is the Pixel Gate UK list of desired content…yeah, we can dream!     Motor Kombat: During the PS2/Xbox/Game Cube era, Mortal Kombat struggled to find it’s feet. A hugely saturated roster, questionable game mechanics and bad stories left the franchise bruised and battered. It wasn’t all doom and gloom, in Mortal Kombat’s madness came a stroke of sheer genius, Motor Kombat. Sure it was silly, and yes it didn’t exactly play all that well, but the element of fun was certainly there. Bombing through a number of tracks set in the Mortal Kombat universe, while controlling a ‘kute’ (couldn’t resit, sorry) version of the MK roster, was bizarrely brilliant. Mortal Kombat X feels like the perfect home for a flashier version of Motor Kombat, even more so with online lobbies.     Chess Kombat: Yet another slice of weird, Chess Kombat appeared in Mortal Kombat Deception. A mixture of chess, RTS and classic fighting, Chess Kombat was a nice distraction. It wasn’t flashy, it wasn’t all that complex, but it was surprisingly addictive. It’s surprising Chess Kombat never appeared in a online enabled Mortal Kombat, now seems like the perfect time.   Puzzle Kombat: Mortal Kombat Deception boasted one of the oddest mini-games in the franchises history in the form of Puzzle Kombat. Two characters battled it out on the bottom of the screen, with their success being determined by the players performance in the simultaneous Tetris like puzzle game. It was hardly a new concept, Street Fighter doing a similar thing previous to Mortal Kombat, either way, Puzzle Kombat was a hilarious pursuit.   Klassic Costumes:   The ball is already rolling with this one with the addition of Klassic Sub Zero. Future patches will see Klassic Scorpion added to the game for free, and hopefully it doesn’t stop there. Reptile and Ermac would seem like natural choices in terms of Klassic costumes, even more so given their ‘pallet swap’ legacy. In a throw back to the original Mortal Kombat, the addtion of original costumes for Kano, Sonya and Johnny Cage feel like good choices for free additions. With decades worth of franchise entries, the sheer potential for Klassic costumes is near endless.   Klassic Stages: Like most fighters, Mortal Kombat has a rich history of iconic stages, most of them with their own fatalities. From temples to bridges, and a few dungeons in between, Mortal Kombat has a large selection of settings that oozed with the universes trademarks. Mortal Kombat X has a decent, and unique, selection of it’s own but jumping back into past battlegrounds would flare up some serious nostalgia.   Meat & Mocap Guy: The pinnacle of running out of ideas for characters, even if they are utterly hilarious.          ...

Konami Cancelling Silent Hills Is A Good Thing

Konami Cancelling Silent Hills Is A Good Thing

Silent Hills, the game that looked set to do what Konami had been trying to do for years, is now officially dead…and that’s great news. It might surprise some people that there’s at least one person whose happy about the cancellation, but I have my reasons, and none of them are ill willed. Silent Hills was always going to be a victim of it’s own success, well specifically P.T’s success, cast firmly in the shadow of expectation of a industry that is unashamedly fickle. P.T was a beautiful slice of pure horror, a far cry from the jump scare/gore heavy horror titles that infest many a retail shelf. The atmosphere, the subtly, the mystery, it was near perfect. The entirety of P.T oozed with a genuine sense of craft, the devil was literally in the detail. P.T consumed the internet, it was no longer just a piece of promotional material, it was a full blown experience, a experience that broke the fourth wall. How do you better something that had such a powerful impact on a audience which, by this point, is entirely cynical and doubting? Apparently you don’t. With Kojima gone, and Silent Hills officially dead, after a weeks of being in limbo, we are now left in a state of positive reflection, and it’s beautiful. Konami’s murder of Silent Hills has inadvertently result in a bitter sweet result, people are growing tired of Konami, but god dam are they talking about Konami…and Silent Hills…and Konami. Like it or not, Konami is relevant again, Silent Hill is relevant again, albeit off the back of some ugly business. After years of trying to reboot the Silent Hill franchise, Konami seemingly killed their only attempt that was gaining any positive attention. Pulling P.T from digital services has resulted in people sitting back and appreciating P.T for what is was, and not for what it is. What started off as a short demo, has now became it’s own entity. Konami didn’t mean for this to happen, but P.T will now take it’s place in video game history, untouched by disappointment, poor sales or over exposure.   Silent Hills represented the next step for Kojima and Konami, and even with that next step well and truly over, Konami finds it’s self in a interesting position. The eyes of the collective video game world are fixed upon them, their backs are against the wall…and it just so happens that Metal Gear Solid: The Phantom Pain releases this year. ‘Kojima’s last stand’, the headlines write themselves. ‘End of a era’, like it or not, 2015 was always going to be a big year for Konami, and the apparent rift between them and Kojima has been marketing gold dust. There’s a morbid curiosity, people are poking Konami like they’re a dead, poking them to see if there’s still life in those old bones. The cancellation of Silent Hills has brought the spotlight back onto Konami, allowing Kojima to work away from the spotlight, which is where he does his best work. How ever way you spin it, Konami, Kojima, Silent Hill, Metal Gear and PT all stand to benefit from the death of Silent Hills. All of them have inherited attention, P.T has even been rewarded with a legacy, a legacy of what could have been. Silent Hill is relevant again, Kojima has time to work, Konami has a ready made angle to market Metal Gear, the death of Silent Hills really is a great thing.   - @linko64    ...

ZombiU – The Unappreciated Gem

ZombiU – The Unappreciated Gem

While the Wii U may be faltering on a number of fronts, I have still had some of the best video game experiences on the system the last generation. Oddly, for a new IP with no connections to previous brands, the sense of nostalgia while playing the game was immense. ZombiU was one of the most refreshing games I’ve played in the last five years. Sure the concept of anything zombie related is now long in the tooth, but ZombiU managed to make the undead threatening again. When ZombiU was released, the market was filled with games in which players would lay waste to hundreds of zombies for laughs. ZombiU went in a different direction, a single zombie could end the players life. It added a sense of challenge to the game , as well as forcing the player to think out each encounter.   Player death wasn’t just a simple case of reloading a checkpoint, it actually had consequences. Upon death players would respawn as a new survivor, stripped off all their gear. This played up the whole ‘surviving the zombie apocalypse’ theme ZombiU was going for. The combination of vulnerability and deaths with consequences made the game an intense experience. Playing ZombiU became awful to play, but in a good way. The threat of losing all of my hard earned gear in an instant was awful, almost foreboding. Every hour I played, I would have a story to share when talking about the game to a friend. I’d not had this experience since playing the likes of Silent Hill and Eternal Darkness. Survival horror had truly reached the next generation, and I was loving it. There’s a number of features in ZombiU that supplements the survival horror aspects, most of them using the Wii U pad.   Sorting out the inventory became a period of weakness for the player, as well as a means for the game to amp up the tension. Seeing zombies shambles towards you on the TV screen ,while you scrambled to pick your desired item of use on the Wii U pad, resulted in some genuine moments of panic. The same applies to opening locked doors and doors protected by key codes. They were neat features which made great use of the Wii U pad. ZombiU was truly one of the best video game experiences I’ve had in a long time. Admittedly it’s a short game, and it’s not perfect, but it’s certainly a awesome survival horror. It’s a shame that ZombiU became one of last years most overlooked titles. Given the struggle the Wii U has been going through, I fear that ZombiU will become one of the hidden gems. It’s also unfortunate that one of the few cases of true survival horror has went under the radar of many.  ...

Trolling Videos: Harmless Fun? Or Something More Sinister?

Trolling Videos: Harmless Fun? Or Something More Sinister?

The Youtube ‘gaming’ section has long been in decline in terms of quality. If it’s not a big youtuber suddenly deciding they like video games all of a sudden, it’s some awful coverage of games with misplaced lingo thrown in. It’s a sorry state, and its even impacting the actually industry (see Toby Turner’s car crash presenting at E3), but a new trend is rapidly on the rise, and it directly effects popular games communities. The ‘Trolling’ video has quickly become one of the most popular video formats. The basic outline sees a user entering a game/lobby (commonly Call of Duty) with the intention to antagonize the other players. At it’s most innocent it’s merely a guy just being annoying down the microphone, at its worst it’s someone pretending to be disabled. Let that sink in, a person is pretending to be disabled and earning money from it….Machinma have also contracted him.   The trolling videos show the very worst of people, most contain at least 200 homophobic and racial slurs. Most involve angry young men going irate at the youtuber to the point of rage quitting. The Youtuber will constantly seek for further reaction, this often results in the language and general tone of the ‘victim’ becoming utterly vile. Some may argue that it’s all in the name of entertainment, and in some cases they’d be right, but some Youtubers trolling feels purely tasteless. There’s something rather unsettling when it comes to someone pretending to be disabled purely to bait out a reaction. The same Youtuber (names will not be mentioned) sometimes makes comments back at his ‘victims’ that are simply vile. There is no morale high ground on either side, the question is how low can they go?   The trolling format is unquestionably successful. At times it can be funny, when the trolling is in moderation, but as the ‘genre’ becomes more stacked, the Youtubers look for a greater reactions from their victims. This can only mean that the baiting will be more severe, more distasteful, all in the name of gaining views and subs. Trolling directly effects video game communities, even if the communities associated are known for their poor nature. People have seen that trolling is a means to gain internet fame (which oddly seems to be something a large number of modern gamers want) with little effort, this leads to people replicating the trolling format. Trolling showcases the very worst of a games community, there is rarely a youtuber who uploads someone reacting well to the trolling. The troller also ruins the game for all those involved in the game/lobby that they are currently trolling. It’s a utterly selfish act to jump into a random game and try to ruin peoples fun, or a more extreme view, waste their time. At the end of the day, people will see trolling videos as harmless entertainment. Most trolling videos are there purely for the enjoyment of others, but there is a line that shouldn’t be crossed. Racial slurs, homophobic insults and vile taunts do little to entertain. It’s a slightly alarming that there’s a large proportion of people who enjoy the more ‘scummy’ trolling videos. If these videos are a sign of the times, and the what a lot of people want from the Youtube gaming circles, then that’s simply disheartening. I whole heartily hope that the trend comes to a end, sooner rather than later. At the very least I hope that the Youtubers in this genre maintain some kind of morality in the pursuit of subscribers and views. After all, if this is the result of modern day gamers, then there’s a lot left to be desired, creatively and morally.          ...

Destiny- A True Game Of The Year, Or Just Another Commercial Victory?

Destiny- A True Game Of The Year, Or Just Another Commercial Victory?

A few weeks ago the Video Game Bafta awards resulted in a few raised eye brows, and a lot of angry tweets. Destiny may of been a finical success, but critical it was a mixed bag. With all that in mind, did it deserve to win Bafta’s 2014 Game of The Year award? did finical clout topple quality? was the negative reaction justified? Here’s a video of some youtubers lying about what Destiny is, even though one of them heavily criticized the game, but BAFTA don’t seem to mind using him to forward the nomination…for some reason. While the Bafta awards have always been a bit questionable, Kane & Lynch being nominated before it’s release stands out, tonight’s were a mixed bag. There were a number of games that deservedly won , while others lost out in what can only be described as a sponsored win (yes, this means Far Cry 4 beating The Banner Saga for best music). The biggest award is, of course, the ‘Game of the Year’ award. In a category consisting of Alien: Isolation, Dragon Age: Inquisition, Mario Kart 8, Shadow of Morder, Monument Valley and Destiny, it was Bungie/ Activisons DLC catalogue that came out on top. Destiny’s victory was not exactly met with approval. Forget the fact the category was missing games such as Shovel Knight, Bayonetta 2 and Wolfenstein: The New Order, Destiny winning was simply odd. It made no sense, but then again, most of the video game BAFTA awards rarely do. Destiny’s victory was not exactly met with approval. Forget the fact the category was missing games such as Shovel Knight, Bayonetta 2 and Wolfenstein: The New Order, Destiny winning was simply odd. Twitter reacted in the best way it knows how, with snarky tweets. The reaction isn’t exactly unjustified. After years of development, and mammoth budget, Destiny shipped as half a game. No match making, end game locked less grouped with friends, no real end game to speak of, small amount of PvP maps and chunks of story simply missing. Destiny, while it did play beautifully, was half baked. To make things worse, retail copies came with two flyers advertising the first two £20 expansion packs, making the lack of core content all the m ore frustrating. Bafta’s credibility has been questionable for sometime, and 2015′s awards is a perfect example of why. On what planet does Far Cry 4 beat The Banner Saga for best video game music? A corporate planet. The award success of Destiny makes even little sense when compared to the critical success of games surrounding it. Each category is judged by a different panel, mostly made of people within the industry from various fronts. It would be interesting to here the justification for Destiny being the chosen game of the year. While Destiny did well commercial, critical it was hit or miss. If sales determine quality, then surely the winners would look totally different since the video game Baftas started?   Back in 2009, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 scooped Baftas Game of the Year award. The reaction to that is pretty much the same as it is to Destiny’s win. The year after that, Call of Duty: Black Ops won the title. Again, the reaction to Call of Duty winning was mostly negative, mainly due to other games out that year. Discussion began to generate, most of it wondering if heavy marketing and sales had trumped quality. For the most part, Bafta has always had a few questionable winners, but Destiny victory has resulted in a particularly vocal response. While of the reactions across the internet, especially Twitter, has been negative mixed with snark, there are a few people who genuinely agree with the choice. Looking at Destiny subjectively, it plays nicely, looks great and is initially enjoyable. While it may suffer from a list of issues, most of which were previously mentioned, does that make it the wrong choice for Game of the year? It all depends on who judged the category. This years nominees were distinctly of the Western variety, with Mario Kart 8 being the only none-Western game nominated. Destiny ticks nearly all the boxes of a big name, Western developed, hit. Large open maps, flashy visuals, constant action, first person shooting, minor RPG elements. It’s the prototypical product of Western video game development. Perhaps tradition and familiarity is what helped Destiny win the award. Alien: Isolation’s hide-and-seek gameplay is to a acquired taste, some may think Mario Kart is too simplistic, Dragon Age too long, Shadow of Morder too much like Assassins Creed. Monument Valley almost felt like the token indie nominee. The sad fact is, we will probably never know why exactly Destiny was selected as the overall winner. Bafta has descended further into the lands of confusion, with big name games winning awards they arguable did not deserve, and perhaps Destiny typifies that more than any other.    ...

Bloodborne Has This Generation At Its Feet

Bloodborne Has This Generation At Its Feet

As Bloodborne slowly creeps closer to release, the buzz around the game is feverish. It’s hard not to get excited, From Software have worked their PR campaign almost perfectly. No in your face Internet adverts, no social media spam, no promises of the world, just gameplay footage and screenshots. From Software have almost created the anti-hype train, without even uttering a word. The fact there’s still immense amount of interest surrounding Bloodborne, without any of the typical Triple A marketing, is a testament to a game’s potential trumping that of a game’s marketability. There’s a argument to be made that over promotion is a typically Western trait. Bloodborne has a lot of responsibility on it’s shoulders, but not by choice. This generation, as young as it may be, hasn’t exactly blown anyone away. The exclusives on both the Xbox One and PS4 have been decent, but not great. There’s been a level of expectation around each exclusive, that expectation has carried from game to game. People are still waiting for that one game to truly deliver the ‘next generation’ experience. A game that screams quality, engrosses the player, gets people talking about their in-game experience. Bloodborne is on track to do exactly that, but it’s being coy about it.   The lack of a marketing assault may just be the best thing to happen to Bloodborne. Some may say it could jeopardise the sales numbers, but I disagree. Much like Demon Souls and Dark Souls before it, Bloodborne can easily become a word of mouth success story. From Software’s pedigree is enough to sell a decent amount of copies to the already established fan base , that fan base will sell further copies via word of mouth. Is it enough to sell PS4 consoles? That’s a whole different question. Exclusives are there to bring in the consumer, it’s one of the main defining factors when it comes to buying a system. At the moment, the PS4 and Xbox One are pretty much on level ground in this sense, Bloodborne could change this. It’s one of the many reasons why Bloodborne is such a interesting release. As a fan of Demon Souls, and a casual player of Dark Souls, Bloodborne is a must buy. I can’t help but shake the feeling that From Software are onto a winner. There’s no obvious warning signs of a bad game, no DLC controversies, no social issues, just a straight up release. Bloodborne is coming out at the perfect time, From Software could very well be on their way to claiming the ‘New Generation’ as their conquered land.  ...

The Old Blood Is Exactly What We Need

The Old Blood Is Exactly What We Need

One of last years best games just got a follow up, and it’s not even going to cost you much. Wolfenstein: The Old Blood has been announced, and oh my days is it what we needed. Balls out, no nonsense, sheer video game joy, it’s exactly what The Old Blood is bringing to the table. Releasing as a standalone experience, The New Blood looks set to bring the fun pack to first person shooter, much like it’s predecessor. Those who missed out on The New Order did themselves no favors. A combination of brilliant gameplay, crazy encounters, and a heavy dose of dark humour, The New Order was sheer enjoyment. It’s rare a modern first person shooter manages to recreate classic genre thrills in the way The New Order did. It filled a gap in the market, and that is still there, making it The Old Blood the perfect filler. Bethesda’s trailer for The Old Blood screams character. It’s dripping with influences from grind house cinema and old B-Movies. It’s the perfect combination. All of The New Order’s humor is present within the 1:53 minute Old Blood trailer. The game knows it’s audience, it knows the strengths of the original, and it revels in them. Thankfully, The Old Blood is seemingly getting the attention of the masses. People who haven’t experienced The New Order are even turning their heads. The Old Blood, a prequel to The New Order, could potentially bring in a new audience for franchise, resulting in a fully fledged sequel. Going back to basics, while applying modern technology, has resulted in one of the purest forms of modern video game entertainment. The Old Blood is exactly what we needed, even so after the stumbling ways of 2015′s initial few ‘next gen’ titles....

Playstation Memories: Abe’s Oddyseey & Little Big Adventure

Playstation Memories: Abe’s Oddyseey & Little Big Adventure

Sony’s Playstation remains as one of the most diverse consoles ever to be released. The sheer variety of games on the platform was staggering. While the likes of Final Fantasy 7, Crash Bandicoot and Metal Gear Solid are first to peoples mind when thinking of the system, I tend to think of the oddities. As a child, I didn’t have a whole lot of access to a number of games. You save your pocket money, you take your chance on a game, often in the bargain bin, and you make do. From time to time you’d manage to borrow one of the ‘big’ games, but for the most part I was limited to random games. This, at the time anyway, was a bit rubbish, but it also exposed me to genuinely unique video games. Abe’s Oddyseey is one of those unique games, and I still recall my initial time with the game to this day.   The first time the game booted up, I had no idea what to expect. My copy came in a blank CD case, mainly due to it being a pirated copy (I didn’t know any better when I was 7), so I was going in totally blind. Even to this day, I’ve never crumpled up in laughter at a video game start menu. Abe’s big greent/blueish, fish eyed, face just starring at me, reacting to what I highlighted, sheer joy. Looking back at it, the menu sets the tone for the rest of the game, something modern games rarely do. As a 7 year old, the game’s mechanics took a little while to get used to. Sneaking, escorting, problem solving, it was taxing for my little mind. With each failure often came a laugh. Trial and error, risk and reward, it all became clear. Abe is one of the strangest video game characters ever created, but he’s a genuinely a brilliant creation. His movements, mannerism and reactions to in-game events made him instantly likeable.   Everyone remembers the first time they farted in the game. The first time they heard Abe mutters ‘whoops’, the first time he blew himself up, fell down a gap, so many memories. Abe’s Oddyseey was a complete new experience for me. It’s genius was lost on me as a child, but it’s sense of humour resonated me with instantly. I never did finish the game, but I can remember my time spent with the game, and how iconic Abe became to me in terms of video games. Abe’s Oddyseey wasn’t the only ‘odd’ game I dipped my toes in. Little Big Adventure is still totally bizarre to me. I never understood what exactly it was, or what I was supposed to do. The protagonists big dopey face, the Monty Python like voices, the hilarious running animations, it was all so odd. In retrospective, Little Big Adventure was the first ambitious game I ever played. As a 7 year old, the creativity of the game didn’t mean much to me. As a 24 year old looking back, it’s a game before it’s time. Even now I still don’t understand some parts of the game, the random kangaroo rummaging around in the bins for example. I never originally played much of the game, but it always stuck with me. The visuals, the characters, the sound effects, the ‘errrr how’s it going?’ line. It’s odd how games almost forgotten by everyone else remain with you. As a child, quality rarely comes into, it’s all about the experience. Little Big Adventure will forever be that curious little game I had to idea how to play, but felt drawn towards it. Fast forward to 2015, my PS4 is currently displaying the HD remake of Abe’s Oddyseey. The menu boots up, and there’s Abe’s big ol’ face. The memorise coming flooding back. Even with the beautiful visual update, it’s still familiar. Playing New N Tasty resulted in me thinking about Little Big Adventure. While one childhood game came back, the other faded away into relative obscurity....

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