Video Games / Editorials

Bayonetta 2: Packing The Soul 2014 Forgot

Bayonetta 2: Packing The Soul 2014 Forgot

2014 has been a hit or miss year for video games, at least from a personal point of view. There’s a number of big releases that have felt a little soulless. While the production values may be top notch on the likes of Watch Dogs, EA UFC and the Evil Within, the games never felt like they had much character. Does this make them bad games? Not really, but it does make them rather forgettable. A video game with charm and character can easily overcome it’s bigger issues, be it a technical issue or something less serious. In the crowd of mature, gritty and challenging titles comes the sheer joys of Bayonetta 2. Bright, bold, beautiful and nothing but sheer fun. It’s a stark reminder to why many people enjoy video games to begin with, Bayonetta 2 just wants to entertain, nothing more, nothing less. Bayonetta 2 contains all the charm of the first, the laughs, the ‘wtf’ moments, it’s all here with added finesse. The franchise has felt like a love letter to video games while progressing the genre.   From the first second, till the last, Bayonetta 2 keeps a cheeky smirk on the players face. While the game is technically sound, it’s the central character Bayonetta that keeps the game moving with a sense of glee. Her personality is infections, each line filled with a mixture of confidence and almost comedic tones. Without the character, the game would lose most of its charm leaving it feeling another just another video game. The Mary Poppins of Witchcraft, Bayonetta unexpectedly broke out to become a modern video game icon, and Bayonetta 2 pushes her even further. Combine the charm of the character with the tight controls and over the top nature of the game and it’s a perfect storm. It’s hard not to feel invested in the game, it’s almost impossible not to have fun in some shape or form. The amount of action going on, the creativity with each move and combo, it’s a true spectacle to behold. Even after the blitz of next generation hype, the simple nature of Bayonetta 2 blows everything out of the water. In a industry which has seemingly forgotten ‘fun’, Bayonetta 2 feels like a breath of fresh air. There’s no hidden meanings, there’s no depressing moral choices, no attempts at making the player feel sympathetic, it’s just simple video game thrills....

Destiny – A Few Minor Changes, For The Greater Good

Destiny – A Few Minor Changes, For The Greater Good

With sometime passing after Destiny’s launch, after many hours put into the game across various planets, strikes and loot caves, it seems like it’s a good time to reflect. Destiny may have a number of issues, chief of which being a lack of matchmaking and varied content, it’s time to focus on the smaller issues. These issues aren’t exactly major, but would improve the game enough to be worthy of mentioning. Destiny plays, sounds, and looks fantastic, but these are few changes I’d like to see just give the game that little extra quality.   And no, matchmaking will not be mentioned, it’s already been discussed here.     More varied Weapon Skins/Sounds -   While Exotics all look unique, and rightly so, the lesser quality items all look far too similar. It’s a truly minor gripe but it has a profound effect on the game visually. Getting your grubby hands on a Legendary just to see how similar it looks to a rare weapon is a little soul destroying, even more so when it’s a weapon earned via reputation and marks. The lack of variety in weapon sounds is also a nagging complaint. It would be nice to hear how heavy certain guns sound, listen to them bellow out proudly. These issues could easily be fixed as time goes on and more content/items are added, here’s to hoping that proves to be the case.   Clans -   Clans/guilds have long been a staple of multiplayer games, and Destiny includes them..kinda. Players can join clans by visiting Bungie’s site and signing up to clans via their pages. There is little to no clan business in the actual game bar the name appearing on the players banner. It’s a little confusing that a game with a focus on joining other players to tackles tasks has basically no clan options. Simply adding a list of clan members in the in-game menu would at least allow players to see whose online and what they are up to. The addition of in-game clan list would also help form fire teams, feeding into the social experience Destiny flirts with. A simple issue to fix, but it does beg the question why didn’t it ship with more in depth clan features.   Communication -   At the present moment, players are restricted to either dancing, pointing, saluting or sitting as a means to communicate in game. With no voice chat, or quick text, there’s no way to talk to other players within the game. Players often bump into each other in wild, they exchanges glances, awkwardly selecting a emote, and then they move on. A local proximity voice chat would be a welcome addition to the game. ‘Hey are you doing this mission/bounty? Want to party up?’ the game suddenly becomes a much more social experience instead of a lonely existence that happens to feature some voiceless faces. Not all players will want to voice chat, making the voice chat a opt in/out option would be a safe bet to keep everyone happy.   No More Defending Ghosts -   Destiny plays extremely well, it’s gameplay is on point. The problem is, the mission structure does very little to make the most of the silky smooth gameplay. From the first hour till the 200th hour, players are sent to go to a object and deploy their Ghost, every time. It would be nice to have some variation put into the missions, be it story or patrol. While shooting waves upon waves of enemies is fun to start off with, after all new guns freshen it up, it becomes a little dragged out after a while. This is another issues that will probably be fixed with the expansions. It’s hard to see Bungie coming out with two new batches of content all featuring the same mission structure, or at least one would hope so.   Let Me Know More About Me -   The character page is a little lacking. While it looks nice and neat, the lack displayed stats and faction reputation is a little bit irritating. Destiny features a strong focus on grinding in it’s end game, be it reputation or marks. It boggles the mind why a player’s current reputation with a faction is not displayed in the menus. The act of flying back to the tower just to see your reputation becomes extremely drawn out. Instead of players finding out their reputation at vendors, put it on their character sheets, add it as a experience bar. It’s a quality of life addition that makes it a lot more easier to plot faction progression.   Customization -   Amour, sparrows, space ships, weapons, the players closest friends in Destiny. While this is mostly a wish rather than a realistic change, more customization options would be brilliant. From my experience, a lot of players are starting to look the same. There’s only so many times you can see the same helmet and armor combinations before thinking it’s a uniform. The ability to customize amour (beyond shaders) would be a nifty little touch. Adding marks to armor, showcasing that players experiences and achievements, seems like a no brainier. Changing up the visual looks of ship and sparrows would also be a welcomed addition. Beat Vault of Glass? Why not show off the fact by adding a design or trophy onto the ship/sparrow?      ...

The Appeal Of The Amiibo – A Success Waiting To Happen?

The Appeal Of The Amiibo – A Success Waiting To Happen?

Nintendo’s Amiibo figures represent a interesting period for the Wii U, not just in terms of video games. Their impact on gameplay, and indeed the games, remains to be seen, but it’s the figures that have me intrigued. Nintendo, out of the ‘big three’, have always had a bit more of ‘collecting’ feel to them. Be it Pokemon, Club Nintendo goods, or even their original card game, Nintendo have always had a collecting feel to a lot of their business. The amiibo could easily be the next big step for Nintendo. With the success of Skylanders and Disney Infinite, it was only a matter of time before more companies jumped on board. While both games were aimed at the younger audiences, they both garnered a more adult following. The quality of the games play a fairly large part in why more mature people flocked to the product, but the concept of collecting was a major draw. From a adult point of view, collecting is kinda awesome. Most of us have went through a stage in a childhood where we collected, traded. ‘Got , got, got , got, need, got, NEED NEED NEED’ was often the song of collecting. Skylanders, Disney Infinite, and now Amiibo, brings some of them memories back.   The start of the trend was thanks to Skylander, a range with a vague connection to semi-popular franchise. The look and feel of Skylanders made it instantly appealing to youngsters, a great gateway into video games. As the range expanded, the collecting focus grew, and kids lapped it up. The high quality models started to call to the adults, and Skylanders crossed over from it’s target audience. Disney Infinite took things once step further, mainly due to it’s licenses and global appeal. Suddenly the market blew up , people could now collect their favorite Disney stars AND play them in a game. The appeal of Disney, the sheer range of characters under their banner is staggering. Disney truly has no limits when it comes to it’s demographic, even more so with the acquisition Marvel and Star Wars. It’s rare you’ll find a fully stocked shelf of Disney Infinite figures, and it’s not due to lock stocking. People are eating up the product, from all ages. Nintendo, like Disney, are pop culture icons and this gives their Amiibo line a huge leg up. Everyone knows Mario, Lugi, Princess Peach, be it a young child or a mature adult, they know Nintendo’s poster boy family.   With Nintendo riding a wave of success at the moment, thanks to Mario Kart 8, Smash Bros and a strong end to 2014 on the way, it’ll be interesting to see how they market Amiibos. Skylanders and Disney Infinite came out across all three major platforms. They did not face any limitations in terms of how big of a potential user base they could target. Amiibo is only set for two systems, one of which is still struggling to truly break into ‘mainstream’.With that being said, the Wii U’s user base is expanding and Amiibo could easily ship more systems, especially in the holiday season. The Amiibo figures themselves look fantastic. Colorful, vibrant and interesting to look at, they genuinely look like collectables rather than video game peripherals. This makes them stand out, bringing in potential customers to at least browse at the product. The fact the Amiibo’s work with the likes of Smash Bros, Mario Party and Mario Kart is a huge plus. The ‘party’ like nature of these games feeds into the collecting buzz. ‘Bring your pads and your Amiibo!’ While all this remains as speculation, it’s hard to see Nintendo’s Amiibo’s failing. The potential audience is so large, the games supported are already hugely anticipated. The stage is set for Amiibo to be a big success. It’ll be interesting to see how the range is launched, promoted and how it impacts sales of both the Wii U and 3DS....

Shadow Of Mordor’s Nemesis System Is A Game Changer

Shadow Of Mordor’s Nemesis System Is A Game Changer

Death has become a little bit of a joke in most modern video games. Quick saves, lacking of challenge, the threat and consequences of death are simply not taken into account any more. Sure there’s rare cases of death being seen as a threat in the likes of Dark Souls, Zombie U and Alien: Isolation, but they don’t effect the game world. The concept of the players death effecting the game world is intriguing, this is where Shadow of Mordor comes in. Death is simply a event, it’s a game changer. The Nemesis system gives the act of dying a sense of real impact, the game is getting harder, the enemies are becoming tougher, death has genuine consequences. Being slain by a enemy, seeing that enemy earn a promotion for the kill, becoming more powerful, it’s a oddly giddy experience. There’s a morbid curiosity to witnessing how the players death affects the game world.   The Nemesis system install a organic sense to Shadow of Mordor, almost to the point where it feels like a reactive world. The player simply isn’t there to interact with their surroundings, they’re there as part of a progressing universe, a cog in the system. The fact enemies can grow and improve by killing the player, gives each battle a sense of risk, making it a much more intense experience. In the grand scheme of the Nemesis system doesn’t just focus on the player. There’s a deep rooted civil war that sees the game in a constant state of change. Taking out a captain open ups a gap for a new captain. When the player is killed, a new captain is created who in turn brings his friends into the other vacant roles. This kicks off a chain reaction or power struggles and recruitment attempts, a truly organic system changing the games world. The players death is always a huge event in the game, and the knock on effect can be felt for hours of in-game time.   Shadow of Mordor should be praised to the high heavens having such a brilliantly devilish system at it’s core. It’s rare that modern video games tries something truly new, something truly game changing. Similar systems could easily be put to use in other genres, such as sports and racing games. The concept of a rival remembering the player, improving from their last encounter, is mouth watering. The Nemesis system could usher in a new bloodline of video games where the worlds feel more organic and reactionary. Here’s to hoping that this is the first step into a whole new video game world....

Destiny – The Lack of Matchmaking Is Inexcusable

Destiny – The Lack of Matchmaking Is Inexcusable

There’s nothing worse than seeing a well respected developer lower their standards and begin to produce poor, half finished, products. It’s always easy to pick up on a half arsed effort in any form of media be it music, film or video games. Bungie were once known for producing quality video games, technically accomplished, well rounded, pure quality. Bungie’s fantastic run has been whole heartily brought to end with the release of Destiny, a true example of what happens when you pump big bucks into a game and rush it out to meet a pre-holiday release window. Destiny has been a huge commercial success, this does not reflect the games quality however. Bungie spent a long time promising the world to it’s fans. Explore a rich world, play how you want when you want, a brand new experience that combines the staples of Bungie with MMO themes. What we got was half a game missing a number of key features…and not many people seemed fussed…and that’s worrying. Destiny, in it’s current state, is a free-to-play experience covered in big budget productions. The lack of story, the lack of content, the lack of balance, the lack of basic quality of life features, it’s genuinely disgusting to see mostly online game released like this. The fact that a good chunk of the end game is locked due to the lack of online match making is pretty dire. Would we forgive this in other games from lesser known developers? Hell no. The main problem with Destiny is it feels utterly unfinished and untested. The lack of content is a huge elephant in the room. ‘You can do heroic strikes and raids!’ while this is the true, the fact heroic strikes and raids are only accessible with a group of friends, this content instantly becomes unplayable by large a number of players. The end game is essentially locked away without putting a decent amount of effort into crawling around message boards looking for players (given there’s no voice/text chat in the game player hub ‘The Tower’, a little like a MMO released decades ago. The lack of content is indeed a issue, but the fact some of this content is not realistically playable due to lack of matchmaking feels whole heartily sloppy, perhaps even lazy, on Bungie’s behalf. It’s depressingly hilarious that a game with a budget of over $300 million, and a focus on online/social interaction, ships with zero matchmaking for it’s endgame. It makes the game feel rushed, unfinished. Get the game out, make the money, sort the issues out later…this is does not feel like the Bungie people became fans of. Destiny, as a whole, is full of issues and problems that suggested the Alpha/Betas were purely for PR/Marketing reasons. The lack of balance between classes in PvP, the loot table, bugged bounties, the excessive grinding. These issues can all be overlooked for now, but a lack of matchmaking is truly inexcusable.  ...

Phil Fish Wants You To Hate him

Phil Fish Wants You To Hate him

Fez was decent, least I thought it was, at it’s heart it was a fun title that made me feel kinda happy. Fez was colorful, slick, enjoyable and consistent. I enjoyed the game and looked back at it as pleasant experience. After all was said and done, I decided to look into the games development and see how it was crated, this resulted in me finding one Phil Fish. A talent young man, there is no doubt, but a egoistical fella. There’s nothing wrong with ego, look throughout creative media, sports and various other purists, a lot of the best people have a ego. The problem with Phil Fish is…he seems to think the world owes him something, he seems to think I owe him something and that you owe him something. Phil Fish isn’t a person, but a person consumed by a character.   I came to this conclusion after watching ‘Indie Game: The Movie’, a lovely little number that shed light on the hardships, struggles and high points of creating a vision. While everyone featured in the film seemed genuine, real, Mr.Fish always seemed like he was ‘playing’ for the camera. As time went on, and his twitter account became more and more active, it seemed like Mr.Fish had turned heel, full heel. Why do I use a term generally used in relation to professional wrestling? It’s simple, Phil Fish is acting like a WWE wrestler, a poor man’s CM Punk. The way in which he interacts with people over social media, his trash talk of his peers, the way in which he reacts to criticism, it all screams ‘playing a character’. I’ve always wondered why he acts like this, my only real conclusion is bad press is better than no press. In running his mouth, slagging off his peers, going overboard on current events, he earns himself a lot of heat which in turn gives him a lot of press. Phil Fish could announce any game he likes at this point and the internet would be all over it, social media (within video game circles) would be buzzing. Even when he’s not working on projects he stays in the news, he’s playing the system. Ethically, his recent exploits are a little dark. Requesting civil war and insulting his fan base seem like awful moves, but given he’s turned Heel, it’s a easy way to get gain heat. Phil Fish wants you to hate him, he thrives on it, he works lives on it. While you could argue it’s a clever means to stay relevant, the whole concept cheapens the joys that Fez brought. The whimsical charms of Fez feel slightly corrupted when you take into account the attitude of it’s creator. The real shame is Fish is super talented, and truly talented people don’t come along too often. His obsession with trying to play the bad guy is his main obstacle. There’s a hope that maybe one day he’ll change his focus, he’ll stop playing the villain, but that doesn’t seem likely. Phil Fish wants you to hate him, and he loves you for doing so....

P.T – A Word of Mouth Success

P.T – A Word of Mouth Success

The popularity of P.T has made me sit back and change my views on a few things. Demos have became a rarity in the modern market, hype sells and thus the big games have no need for a demo. Heck, even the smaller games tend to release without demos, they’ve became a thing of the past. In place of demos, we now have early access, alpha/beta tests and marketing…this is why P.T intrigues me. P.T is part demo, part marketing…a playable piece of marketing…and that’s fantastic. Word mouth of works wonders, and P.T has been doing the rounds as soon as it hit PSN. Given P.T’s length, content and hidden puzzles, it’s perfect to recommend to someone, even if it’s purely to try scare the hell out of them. When people hear how terrifying a game is, they often want to test it out, see if it’s as scary as people say. P.T’s simplicity opens it up to the masses, anyone can play it regardless of skill level or knowledge on what the game is. P.T goes beyond being a demo, the manner in which it popped out of no where, the way it captured peoples attention, it’s a similar impact to that of the original Flash game Slender. Sure it may have some major names behind it, sure it’s part of a major franchise, but it’s the perfect PR move for a franchise that’s been rather out of date for some years. Silent Hill has struggled for sometime now, while Downpour may not of been awful, Homcoming was just ‘okay’ and the Wii titles went under the radar, the franchise on the whole is stale. Announcing a new Silent Hill title wouldn’t of made much of a impact, but with big names such as Kojima behind it…things go up a notch, and P.T took things even further. Given how many variables exist within P.T, and how many things can go unseen on initial playthroughs, people banded together and began to discuss various things they had figured out or differences during their playthroughs. This was yet another means in which P.T became almost viral, it created a active community for a game just announced, bringing a potential base of buyers already.   While Demos may of became a less popular option for bigger games and names, P.T proves there’s still a foundation to be built upon. While it’s unclear how much of a representation P.T is for the final product (one assumes it won’t truly mirror the final release in most ways), the buzz it’s already crated for the game is staggering. A true triumph in using a kinda demo, kinda marketing tool, to inflate hype for a franchise essentially dead in the water.  ...

I Couldn’t Finish The P.T. Demo

I Couldn’t Finish The P.T. Demo

In terms of media, there’s not much that really scares me. Horror films and video game rarely scare me, though some make me uneasy. Big name horror titles from last year such as Outlast didn’t really have much effect on me. I understand how they were trying to scare, but it felt like a haunted house more than a genuine horror experience. There’s a certain craft missing from a lot of horrors, both video game and film. True fear isn’t created by simply creating a ugly image, nor is it created by jump scares. True masters of horror build up their scares, they create tension, they slowly cut into the player/viewer. The P.T demo caught my interest pretty early on. Ignoring the hype, the big names and the brand name, I went into P.T utterly blind. What I found was one small, well crafted, finely tuned experience. The demo starts cold, no trailer, no background, not a single detail…and it works perfectly. There’s a mystery behind P.T that slowly reveals itself, as long as the player is willing to take in their surroundings. Each footstep, each turn of a corner, each opening of a door, it all flows into the creation of tension . The sound effects that inhabit P.T stalk the player making them question and worry. The subtle touches dotted around the demo create a truly uneasy atmosphere in which the player begins to become unnerved…and they cant even out their finger on why. It’s these touches that give P.T a sense of character, a real sense of craftsmanship. *spoilers in video – my live reaction to P.T* The demo had truly sent chills down my spine. P.T shares similar tones to films such as Easerhead and Japanese horror such as Ju-On. It’s all neatly tied together to create a simple, yet highly effective, horror experience that leaves the player feeling utterly at the games mercy. Lighting, sound effects, visual cues, they’re all utilized in such a manner that it leaves the player utterly distraught at what is coming next. P.T managed to do what very few films and video games do, it managed to get into the head, it became more than just a set of pixels on screen. I genuinely felt creeped out, uneasy, vulnerable and scared. It got to the point where I couldn’t finish the demo in fear of waking up the neighbours. If this is a sign of things to come, perhaps we have one of the purest horror titles in video game history on our hands....

The Problems Of Adopting New Systems Too Early

The Problems Of Adopting New Systems Too Early

Buying into new consoles is always a odd experience. There’s a number of elements that come into play, mostly attempts to justify spending vast amounts of money on a system with barely any games. The chief feeling, and most welcomed, is excitement. There’s always a buzz when it comes to walking into the store and picking up the ‘next big thing’. I waited for months, pre-order slip in hand, counting down the days until the PS4 was released. My enjoyment of video games had became a little stale, the PS4 was something to get excited about. New experiences, new features, and as lame as it sounds…them shiny visuals. Killzone: Shadowfall was the main game that had me wishing the PS4 was closer to release, seeing the glory of the game in action was mouth watering. While my PC had given me plenty of visual thrills, the idea that consoles were pumping out these visuals was a wonderful concept to behold.   The PS4 release came around, I booked a day off work and set off to pick up my system. Even on the way there I can recall thinking about all the risks I was taking in terms of investing early. The lack of games at launch, what if it suffered errors like the 360 did at launch? How do I justify spending this much money on such a trivial object. By the time I had picked up the system, paid, and journeyed home, all the doubts faded, only excitement remained. It’s a cycle I’ve went through with every console release since the Game Boy Advanced…and I wouldn’t change it for the world. My traditional cycle, when it came to buying new systems, had been thrown out the window when it came to the Xbox One. After saving up money, I found myself in a GAME store looking at Microsoft’s big fat black box. My feelings towards the Xbox One were a little off, the disastrous E3 (2013), the terrible PR, it had left me a little wary of the system. Even with all that in mind, I found myself walking out with a Xbox One in hand.   I’ve enjoyed my times with both the Xbox One and the PS4, but issues had arisen. By buying both system so early on, I had found myself barely using one of the systems. While the Xbox one had me hooked on Plants vs Zombies: Garden Warfare, beyond that there was little to keep me around. Titanfall was a brief distraction, as too was Dead Rising 3, but the Xbox One was far my system of choice. Multiformat titles were often purchased for the PS4, resulting my library out numbering my Xbox One games by a large margin. The truth is, neither system has games that are exclusive while being must plays. Both consoles offer enjoyable games, but nothing that will make a true impact on the player. While nice visuals are a treat to behold, and using consoles various nifty features (the PS4 touch pad for example) makes for curious enjoyment, neither system truly feels like it’s the next step in video games…at least not yet. Call it buyers remorse, regret, or even nativity, buying into both systems this early on was a mistake. After nearly a year of decent, but not brilliant, next gen (or new gen, if you will) games , the resulting feeling is a little underwhelming. It’s a similar problem that popped up with the release of the Ps Vita and the Nintendo 3DS, so it’s not like this is a new concept. While others may be more than pleased with their next gen experiences, there’s still niggling sense of regret personally, too much too soon feels like the best way to sum up the situation.   2015 is looking far better with a plethora of big name games coming to both the Xbox One and PS4. While 2014 has been a rather sleepy year, the new systems will hopefully pick up traction in 2015, eliminating my lingering senses of regret. At the end of the day, Plants Vs Zombies: Garden Warfare is still the best next generation experience so far…and that is the biggest surprise when it’s all said and done.    ...

2014 In Reflection: The Disappointments So Far

2014 In Reflection: The Disappointments So Far

As the busy window of major release comes ever a closer, it seems like a good time for a spot of reflection. 2014 was set to be the next generations first year of glory, but has it been the case? 2014 has been a strange year, filled with delays and more questions than answers. With hardware questions and concerns aside, the games of 2014 (so far) have been a mixed bag. Major releases, returning favorites and under the radar games, plenty of choice. 2014 has so far left a slight bitter taste in my mouth, mainly due to the failings of some of the biggest games. Pointing out disappointing games is easy, what’s hard is underlining exactly what made them disappointing. Watch Dogs, arguably the biggest game released so far, was a prime example of curious disappointment. Watch Dogs is not a bad game, in fact it’s a decently crafted game with some nifty ideas….but that it never goes beyond decent. Watch Dogs felt safe, so safe that it became unremarkable. When a game is ear marked as one of the biggest releases of the year, it’s hard not to expect something beyond decent. Watch Dogs came and went, it’s impact never truly felt as profound as it was once expected to be. Watch Dogs wasn’t the only big title to result in underwhelming reactions, EA made sure they took that crown with their half arsed UFC title. After a full year of hype, PR, heavy marketing campaigns and constant plugs, EA’s début UFC title felt like only half a finished product. While the game looked and sounded fantastic, the gameplay was uneasy mix of arcade and realism. For a game that boasted about how true to life it was, the gameplay felt silly. The stand up was decent, the ground game was a utter mess, the lack of content was unforgivable. EA UFC, as a whole product, was utterly hollow. While Watch Dogs felt like a flat, but well crafted game, EA UFC felt like a rushed out cash in on the fattest growing sport. A true disappointment in every respect.   Titanfall fronted Microsoft’s Xbox One charge, the next big thing into competitive multiplayer, and to it’s credit the majority bought into hype. Familiar gameplay married with smooth movement, jet packs and mechs, it’s easy to see why Titanfall created such a buzz. Upon its release, Titanfall was hugely enjoyable. The fast paced action, the meta game, the game within a game, the engaging action, it all worked. Titanfall is well made, it’s confident, but it’s also lacking. The lack of maps and game modes hurt the game in the long run. Titanfall soon became a overly too familiar experience, and was yet another game lacking content. After all the promises of Titanfall changing the multiplayer shooter scene, the end result felt more like a sign of potential rather than a statement of intent.   On the flip side, InFamous: Second Son shared a similar fate. While the game was truly beautiful and well crafted, a wafer thin story and lack of content left the game falling short of high standards sets by previous entries. Second Son was hugely enjoyable, but it’s abrupt ending and sloppy story detract from the overall experience. After the story was complete, the lack of content truly became clear. Traveling around the environment is initially fun, but wares thin pretty quickly. Taking out enemy outposts and collecting bits and bobs was the only real additional content, which was a crying shame. A good showing of what the PS4 is capable of, but hardly a compelling experience like the last two InFamous titles.   2014 has so far provided a number of disappointing games, but it’s also played host to some surprises. Surprise contenders for Game of the Year, fantastic modern experiences bleeding with classic mechanics, a pure fun. These surprise titles have all offered something different and already began to earn themselves a cult following. We’ll look back at these titles in the next reflection....

Page 1 of 16123»