Video Games / Collectors Corner

Collector’s Corner: Wind Waker & A Link Between Worlds Collector’s Editions

Collector’s Corner: Wind Waker & A Link Between Worlds Collector’s Editions

The last few months have seen the release of two Legend of Zelda titles. Both games have their own collector’s editions, with one being a retailer-exclusive, but how do they actually measure up as collector’s editions? I’m going to take a short look in this post.   The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker HD Collector’s Edition Wind Waker HD is one of the Wii U’s biggest games to date. The 2003 classic looks utterly fantastic after going through its HD facelift. It’s arguably one of the best-looking games this generation, but the game still holds all the quality and charm that made it a success when it originally launched–just with a prettier face. The collector’s edition retailed at £59.99, the average price for most collector’s editions, and only contains one item. The edition includes the game, no download codes or similar items, and a rather nice figurine of Ganondorf, complete with clear plastic case. The figurine itself is nicely sculpted, with the paint work being of exemplary quality. It doesn’t feel cheap; instead it feels like it’s crafted from a decent-quality solid plastic. It’s not a spectacular piece, but it would undoubtedly look good amongst a Zelda display or something similar. It’s a nice little edition, bu it’s just a shame it doesn’t come with a soundtrack or even an art book like prevvious Zelda Collector’s editions. For the money, some may find it a little underwhelming, but big collectors will appreciate the detail put into the figurine. It’s a decent edition, just not a great one. The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds Collector’s Edition Released this week just gone, The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds Collector’s Edition is a nifty little bundle. This GAME-exclusive is no longer up for sale on the retailer’s site. But for reference, its RRP was £49.99. The edition includes a beautiful large poster, a shiny cover art for the game, a download code for Link’s Awakening DX, and a small treasure chest. The main reason many people rushed to buy this edition was simply for the chest. Why is it so special? Each time the chest is opened (its use is to store 3DS games inside), it plays the legendary jingle from the game when an item of importance is found.   It may sound infantile but there’s an undeniable sense of nostalgia each time the treasure chest is opened. Its small size only allows up to five 3DS games to be stored in it, but the sound effects will kill off any disappointment with the chest’s size.   For the price, it’s hard to not like this collector’s edition. The chest is a wonderful little item and the poster is truly beautiful. The demand is high for this edition, with the chest alone currently going for £45+ on Ebay. It’s a must-have for any fan of the franchise, though the chest is certainly not worth the prices people are paying for it on Ebay....

Collectors Corner: Video Game Collecting for Beginners – Where to Buy

Collectors Corner: Video Game Collecting for Beginners – Where to Buy

Collecting video games , and memorabilia based on video games, can be a rewarding and highly enjoyable hobby. There’s a wide range of things people tend to end up specializing in, from older home consoles to rare imported games, even to odd and quirky merchandise. The tricky part about collecting, however, is starting out. There are plenty of places and ways to build up your collection, but the problem is that some of these methods cost far too much compared to others. For example, the collector’s market, especially for retro systems and games, is full of pitfalls for non-collectors. Nevertheless, after more than 9 years of scouting car boot sales, markets, charity shops and websites, I have gained quite a lot of experience–and this new feature will look at various starting points and tips in how to break into the world of collecting. Addendum: this a guide purely for the collectors, not the people looking to make money from their investments.   Where to Buy The first place most would-be collectors go to is the auction powerhouse Ebay. While it can be a good starting point, it can also be a playground for inflated prices and reproductions. The problem with Ebay is that many users tend to look for starting prices based off a similar–or the same–item, so if one user posts an item with an inflated price, chances are that others will follow. Another problem with Ebay is lack of information the average user has at their disposal. This lack of info normally leads people to request silly prices for common games (mainly of the sports genre) purely because they are quite old. When using Ebay, try to stay away from dealers (those who run stores dealing exclusively in retro/collectible goods) as they tend to ask for the highest price. It’s not worth paying £30 for a core NES unit when you can find the same item–or better–elsewhere for a cheaper price and from an average seller. Single lots can be a double-edged sword; you tend to pay towards the higher end of the item’s value, and the item is normally contested by a number of people. Buying in bulk can be a fantastic way to approach Ebay. Bulk purchases normally consist of common games that aren’t worth too much. They are, however, a good starting point to any collection. There’s always the chance that you’ll come across a rarer game in a job lot, but sorting through all those games also gives off a bit of a buzz. Away from the likes of EBay, you have the traditional places such as car boot sales, markets, and charity shops. Car boot sales can be great places to pick up rare titles for a decent price. They can also be home to older consoles that are normally bundled with a bunch of games and accessories. Given that most car boot sales are filled with people looking to make a quick buck out of stuff THEY DON’T WANT (this is key to haggling–remember that!), their goods tend to be fairly priced. Don’t be afraid to haggle, either, as chances are they don’t want to be taking their items back home with them. Use that knowledge to your advantage Car boot sales offer the widest range of games and consoles from across the years at decent prices. The main problem with them (and some markets) is normally the condition of the items. You rarely have any way of knowing if the items work. The only thing you have is the word of the seller. You can always check the item itself for any visible damage or signs of a faulty system (if you can hear things rattling around inside that’s rarely a positive sign), but asking the seller questions is also beneficial, too. Car boot sales can be a successful hunting ground, but if you’re willing to be a little more vocal towards the seller, your chances of success may be greater. Markets are mostly the same as car boot sales, only with the added trade-off of dealers being present at most markets. These people, much like Ebay dealers, will try get the top price for all of their items–and some even disregard the condition of the item. Rarely there are a few dealers who appreciate a collector and will even cut a deal, because after all, it normally results in a returning customer. So don’t be afraid to haggle with dealers. Finally, we get to the strange beasts known as charity shops, who have become an increasingly worse place to pick games/systems up from. Some shops will refuse to take in electrical goods without them first passing a test. When charity shops do sell games or systems, they tend to be either damaged or quite pricey. Most shops tend to have their prices set by the manager/staff in the store, too, thus making it hard to really comment on charity shops on the whole. Once again, haggling is an option. For example, I once spent six months working at a charity shop in which staff were encouraged to haggle to secure a sale. For the most part, charity shops tend to sell games (PS1/N64/Dreamcast onwards, from my experience) rather than consoles. When they do sell consoles, it’s usually portable systems, especially those handheld games by the likes of Tiger, as pictured below.    ...