Film

Ben Affleck’s Batsuit Revealed!

Ben Affleck’s Batsuit Revealed!

By now, the internet is freaking out over the reveal of Ben Affleck’s batsuit which he’ll be throwing on for Batman vs Superman. The film is being helmed by Zack Snyder and is to be the follow-up to Man Of Steel which introduced Henry Cavill as Superman. These two heroes will also be joined by Gal Gadot who will be playing Wonder Woman, Jeremy Irons playing Bruce Wayne/Batman’s butler, Alfred Pennyworth and Jesse Eisenberg (still skeptical) as Lex Luthor. The film, to be released in May of 2016 will be the first appearance of Ben Affleck as Batman. People are saying he doesn’t fit the role, or it just won’t work, but haven’t seen him in action yet. I am incredibly excited for Affleck in the role and I can’t get over how good both the Batsuit, and the new Batmobile look. They’re both just lovely....

The Amazing Spider-Man 2: Review

The Amazing Spider-Man 2: Review

Spider-man, Spider-man, does whatever a spider can. Amazing Spider-Man is the follow up film to 2012′s, Amazing Spider-Man and sees the return of Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker/Spiderman. I was a massive fan of the previous Spidey film and praised Andrew’s performance as both Peter and the web-slinger. He nailed something in the character that I felt like Tobey McGuire was missing in his performances in the original three films. We get that solid character and performance continued on in the second Amazing film and he continues to show that he has acting chops. WARNING: Spoilers are in-bound. Use your Spidey Senses at your own discretion. Amazing Spider-Man 2 opens with a pretty hectic scene revolving around the disappearance of Richard, and Mary Parker whom are Peter’s parents. They’re aboard a private jet which is then hijacked by an assassin obviously sent from Oscorp, but Richard succeeds in sending out information that we learn about later on in the film. With the pilot dead the plane crashes and we can safely assume that both Richard and Mary are killed upon impact. Even though this scene doesn’t exactly explain much it was still a nice little thing for myself as a viewer to witness. However, I wouldn’t be entirely disappointed if it was cut from the final product. Boom. Fast forward to present day and Peter is still taking down baddies as Spider-Man. We then have him chase after one of the cooler Spider-Man villains, Aleksei Systevich/The Rhino (Paul Giamatti) who is attempting to steal a truck packed full of plutonium. Which I believe is a key ingredient in making nuclear bombs or something destructive like that. During this high-speed chase, Spidey saves a bumbling, apparently mentally unstable Oscorp employee by the name of Max Dillon (who would later become the film’s titular villain, Electro played by Jamie Foxx) which sort of sets up an encounter later on in the movie. While doing all these shenanigans he’s also on the phone with his girlfriend, Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone) in which he sees a “vision” of her father George Stacy (Dennis Leary) who died at the end of the first film. This reminds Peter that he made a promise to George to keep Gwen out of his life as Spider-Man. This causes the couple to break up. While I admit the relationship aspect of this film was sort of meh, it is an integral part of Peter’s story in the comics regarding the story between him and Gwen Stacy, so I can see that it needed to be played out. We then have an introduction of yet another character with Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan) whom was a child-hood friend of Peter’s and has returned to New York City to see his terminally ill father, Norman Osborn (Chris Cooper) to which he explains his illness is hereditary and that poor Harry is at the age in which it begins to develop. He gives Harry a small device which he explains contain his life’s work, and the following day he dies leaving Harry the now acting CEO of Oscorp. Gears begin to turn, things are set into motion, and my worry of multiple villains being introduced starts to show. We are then thrown right into a scene where Max whom now idolizes Spider-Man, and believes that they are friends is tending to some equipment in one of Oscorp’s laboratories and falls into a tank of genetically modified electric eels. The eels then begin to attack Max savagely, and he begins to mutate into a living electric generator and cause the birth of Electro. So, here is the third and main villain finally starting to pop up in the film. Things are moving pretty fast plot-wise, but I’m still hooked. Let’s get back to the relationship sub-plot with Gwen and Peter. I have to throw this out there though. This relationship/chemistry is definitely easier to handle and watch unlike in the original films between Tobey and Kirsten Dunst. So, we learn that Gwen is thinking of going to England for school which obviously looks like it stuns Peter and upsets him. Before they can fully talk about the situation Electro ends up in Times Square and causes a scene. This in turn causes Peter to suit up and go handle the situation in the best way we can. When Peter arrives as Spider-Man we see that police are preparing to fire on Electro if he does anything. As Spider-Man is attempting to calm him down the police open fire on Electro who loses his temper and attack the police. Spider-Man eventually beats Electro and he’s quickly shipped off to Ravencroft which is a type of prison for the mentally ill. This is where we get the first glimpse of how Electro is what you’d call a “tragic villain” and it’s not his fault he’s insane. He’s got some kind of mental illness that causes him to lash out and get angry. He just wants people to know who he is. I really like how they made Electro look in the film. Most of his outfits in the comics are pretty weak, and it’s a relief they didn’t go with something like his green, and yellow outfit that makes him look like some type of daffodil. I love this look of Electro and I can imagine they’ll probably incorporate this look into the comic (unless they already have, I haven’t been up to date on my Spidey comics in a while). Let’s get back to the film. Then we’re thrust into another plot-line revolving around Harry Osborn. Remember him? It looks like his illness has begun to show its symptoms and his father’s device helps him deduce that Spider-Man’s blood might help save his life and cure his disease. Sadly, the way they explain this is kind of weak and I’m still not too sure how that plan would exactly work. The only thing I could grasp is that later on in the film we learn more about Richard Parker explaining that he injected his own DNA or something into the spiders from Oscorp which obviously explains how Peter bonded with the spider so well when it bit him. It’s still a pretty weak and vague explanation. So, to make matters worse for dear, old Harry it turns out that Oscorp has framed him for the accident with Max Dillon which caused him to turn into the villain Electro which causes him to lose his title as CEO. We then have Felicia Hardy (BLACK CAT IN THE COMICS, OH SHIT) tell Harry that there may be some equipment that could save his life, so he goes to meet Max/Electro and strikes a deal with the blue guy to get himself back into the Oscorp Building. This is when he finds some of the venom from the genetically engineered spiders and instead of curing Harry it turns him into some horribly, disgusting looking goblin-like creature. Welcome to the birth of Green Goblin, our other villain in this film. I must be in the minority that didn’t see an issue with the villains in this movie. The main villain of the film is Electro, and it’s obvious. Green Goblin, and Rhino are only in the film for a few minutes for key plot points to set up the following films. It’s not too hard to comprehend and for me it didn’t ruin anything in terms of quality of the film. I still enjoyed watching the movie, and I think Dane DeHaan’s Green Goblin is by far the best looking Goblin we’ve had in most Spider-Man media. James Franco’s Green Goblin was just…lame. Then again, he was Hobgoblin wasn’t he? I don’t remember, Spider-Man 3 was kinda wank. Anyways. We’re then thrown right back into the relationship (which I enjoyed, bring the hate) with Gwen calling Peter and leaving a message explaining that she went to the airport because the scholarship in England got accepted earlier then they thought. Not wanting to leave on bad terms, Peter meets Gwen on the bridge and professes his love for her and vows to go to England with her, which would obviously cause him to stop being Spider-Man but we know that’s not going to happen considering Electro is still around somewhere. Then again, Peter still think he’s locked up. However, Electro decides to ruin this touching moment by causing a mass blackout so Peter leaves the scene to go fight Electro, and against his comfort Gwen follows him. The two of them restore power, and causes an overload which seemingly kills Electro, but I pretty much doubt he can be killed that easily. We’ll see in the next films won’t we? Harry shows up with his power amor, and Glider and sees Gwen which leads him to figure out that Spidey is Peter Parker and vows to get revenge on him for refusing the blood transfusion from Spider-Man and kidnaps Gwen and flies to the top of a clock tower. The two of them have an all out brawl with Spider-Man subduing Harry, but fails to save Gwen who falls from some gears in the tower to her death. This scene in particular is probably the strongest in the entire film for multiple reasons. It distinguishes a major element in the development of Peter Parker as a character and how he handles the death of his love in his future as Spider-Man. It’s a pivotal moment for him as a character and they captured that moment beautifully on film. It also makes some subtle hints to the comic issue where Gwen is killed off. She wears a very similar outfit to the one she wore in the comic the night she died, and once she hits the ground after her fall the clock strikes the time of 1:21, and the comic issue she died in was 121 which was released in 1973. This pleased the Spidey comic book fan inside me greatly, aside from the tragic, tear-jerking scene of Peter weeping over the body of the girl he was in love with. This also makes sense as to why Mary Jane Watson was cut from the film in the end. It wouldn’t of suited how we were supposed to feel emotionally at the conclusion. It feels better this way, and I can imagine fans of the Spiderman comics, and films can agree on this point. Even if you didn’t enjoy the film, I’d like to think that this scene in particular hit home with everyone. It was being foreshadowed for the entire film, and it was always inevitable. However, five months pass and we learn that Peter has stopped being Spider-Man for good, which I hate to say it is a common thing that bothers me about superhero films. Something usually happens in one of the franchises that causes the hero to “quit” being who they are because of a death, or some sort of tragic event. I get that it’s a part of character development but I’m actually fed up with seeing it. Minor complaint and all. Harry is healing from his grotesque transformation and is approached by Gustav Friers (the man in the shadows from the first film) who discuss the formation of a small team to take out Spider-Man which is a nod the group formed in the comics called the Sinister Six and the fact we’re getting a spin-off film about them makes me a happy camper. We also get a secondary nod with this by seeing Doc Ock’s arms, Vulture’s Wings, and the Rhino’s mechanical suit. This evil duo make their first move by freeing Aleksei and giving him the suit, which thus gives birth to The Rhino (one of my favorite Spidey villains besides early Venom, and Carnage). We’re then treated with a scene where Rhino inside the mechanical suit, which looks completely bad-ass. I really loved the design and over-all look of it. I’m glad they went this route because I imagine just some bloke wearing a Rhino looking skin-tight outfit would of been lame and sort of…underwhelming. But wait, is that Spider-Man? Nope, it’s a small child dressed as Spider-Man attempting to confront The Rhino. Pretty brave kid, I wouldn’t have the balls to do that unless I had some form of super-power or like…anti-tank weapon. We’re then treated with a lovely scene where Peter is watching Gwen’s graduation speech which inspires him and he goes out to meet Rhino head on, and ultimately saves the kid. And, the film just sort of abruptly ends with Spidey attacking Rhino, which obviously is probably set up for the third Amazing film, and we’ll most likely see The Rhino as the titular villain in that movie. I’m perfectly okay with this because Paul Giamatti is a superb actor and from the few minutes we saw of him in the movie I’m excited. — VERDICT: Amazing Spider-Man 2 may not be as good as the first film, but I enjoyed my time with it. I still think Andrew Garfield is the perfect choice for Spider-Man, and the chemistry between him and Emma Stone really shows on screen. The two of them are wonderful together and I’d like to see them work together more often, which might be a stretch considering they are a real-life couple (eat that up comic fans). Of course the plot did jump around a bit, and there was some bits that seemed like they were shoehorned in and really didn’t serve much of a purpose. Jamie Foxx was superb as Electro, and I feel like he was one of the selling points in the movie. I’m not understanding the hate behind the film, and the only logical thing I can think of is people expected it to be something it’s not. It’s a setup film, and if you go into your viewing realizing that, and knowing that you’re probably going to have a good time with the movie. It’s far from being a terrible movie like most of the critics are saying. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 gets a solid… 7/10    ...

Noobz: The Misrepresentation of Video Game Culture

Noobz: The Misrepresentation of Video Game Culture

The last few years have seen some truly wonderful films based on video game/nerd culture. Indie Game: The Movie showed the passion and dedication with which the indie scene is brimming. The Dungeon Masters gave us an insight into the importance of gaming (albeit in the pen-and-paper format) in people’s lives, even showing how D & D acted as a release for some rather troubled individuals. The King of Kong, also, was a wonderful story of one man’s sheer determination to clear his name as a cheat, and reclaim a title once stolen from him. All these films provide a wonderful insight into the culture that is slowly becoming more and more mainstream. 2012′s Noobz, however, is pure garbage. A film for gamers by gamers, this was the gimmick the film’s marketing team went for. Noobz is simply a vile, unoriginal, waste of time. I watched the film out of pure curiosity, mostly due to hearing mixed things about it. After sitting through all ninety-seven minutes of the film, I came to the unwelcome conclusion that Noobz does in fact represent a large portion of today’s video game culture.   Noobz follows a group of Gears of War fans as they drive across the country to play in an e-sport event. The film features a number of characters that have very few likable, or even realistic, traits. The majority of such all revolve around things that feel utterly awkward. One of the group members (Oliver) is a camp-acting young male, and his only role is to make vaguely sexual jokes towards men. His character role in the group is to be on the wrong end of jokes aimed at his supposed sexuality. The only people that will find these jokes funny are pre-teens who often spend their time in Call of Duty lobbies yelling ‘fag’. Cody fills the role of the main character, and what I assume is supposed to be the ‘average gamer’. He is, however, utterly unlikeable and totally withdrawn from reality. Cody is fired from his job, left by his wife, and all because of his dedication–addiction–to his Gears of War clan. The character drifts through the whole film being nothing but a lifeless douchebag to people. His only place in life is literally to play Gears. The people this character will appeal to don’t exist, and if they do then humanity is doomed.     Andy is possibly the most relatable character of the bunch. While he is something of a passive-aggressive slacker, the character has a job and has interests beyond Gears of War. The character makes social links outside of his clan; this further pushes him as the most human character in the group. The last character of the group is Hollywood, and all of the jokes around him focus on his disability. Hilarious, right? Wrong. Sure, Noobz is supposed to be a dumb movie, and its characters embody this, but it’s also supposed to represent video game culture. The tone of the jokes, the way in which characters interact with each other and the people around them, is all in poor taste and subsequently fails to resonate with the majority of gamers. For years people have almost looked down on the industry and its customers as social outcasts; Noobz reinforces this stereotype. The film conveys the impression that gamers are immature wastes of space that live for only one reason: to play video games. The likes of Indie Game: The Movie, The King of Kong, and The Dungeon Masters all did a fantastic job of representing video game culture, but Noobz is at the bottom end of the spectrum. There is almost certainly a population of gamers to which Noobz will appeal to and represent, but the chances are these people are the ones running your online experience.    ...

Top 5 Televison Deaths of 2013

Top 5 Televison Deaths of 2013

People die in television shows all the time and it really hits home for some of them. These are my choices for the top five deaths that we saw onscreen in 2013. Reminder, some of these are spoilers so please bear with me. You’ve been warned. These are also in no particular order, just the ones that hit me the hardest from shows I watch. I’m going to try and limit there for one per series.   #5 – Robb Stark (Game Of Thrones) I didn’t know about the Red Wedding and what I was going to expect, even though things leading up to the death seemed to going a little too well. This entire scene was one of the most difficult television experiences I’ve had, and struggled getting through the scene. Now with the recent Purple Wedding happening in the show it just makes me wonder if people in Game Of Thrones should stop getting married. It doesn’t end well. Plus, I imagine being stabbed in the heart like that after watching your wife and unborn child get murdered would be quite welcomed.   #4 – Tommy Merlyn (Arrow) I’ve just started watching Arrow and since this death occurred in 2013 I can lump it in this list. These sort of deaths really hit home. Killed by falling debris while trying to save Laurel Lance, his buddy Oliver (The Arrow/Green Arrow) arrives too late and witnesses his best friend die. This death changes something in Oliver and decides that he doesn’t need to kill people to deliver justice, and changes his ways of dealing with criminals to honor Tommy’s memory. That’s a nice little sentiment, but I wonder if Tommy is truly dead. It seems like people don’t stay dead on this show. Then again, his is a probably permanent death. I feel like a “revival” would ruin the whole character development going on with Oliver right now. That being said, I’ve just started Season 2 so we’ll see. #3 – Hershel Greene (The Walking Dead) A death I knew had to happen sometime as it seemed like he was the only link to the “old world” and it’s a really pivotal death in terms of some character development. His story was done, and it was only a matter of time before Hershel bit the bullet. Decapitated by the Governor, but it confuses me on how a decapitated head can reanimate. That being said, his death is really the only one that has affected me in the show. I’ve slowly been getting a little tired of the show and feeling like it’s becoming stale. Season 4 didn’t exactly fix those things for me. We’ll see what happens in the next season. #2 – Kevin Tran (Supernatural) It’s been shown that in Supernatural, anyone who gets close to the Winchesters usually ends up in a bad spot. I was totally blown away by Kevin being killed off, but it sort of makes sense in a way, right? I can’t figure out if his death was to make the plot move forward, or they couldn’t figure out much more to write in terms of Kevin. Either way his death was pretty brutal, especially for being a kid. I really hope Dean gets his revenge on Gadreel for killing Kevin while possessing Sam. I hate Gadreel. #1 – Walter White (Breaking Bad) Speculation was crazy in the last few episodes of Breaking Bad, and that was mainly who was going to make it to the end. Most people believed that Jesse was going to be killed off by either the Nazi-dudes or by Walter White himself, but in a wonderful final few moments in the series we see Walter decimate the Nazi group with a machine gun controlled by remote control, and then execute Jack in a similar manner to how Jack killed Hank. Walter saved Jesse, and it’s a moment I had wanted for the entire show’s run. Jesse deserved redemption and I like to believe that’s what he got. Walter walking through the meth-lab at the end of the episode and dying at peace from a self-inflicted gunshot wound was a very interesting, and probably the best way to end the series. The only person who could stop Walter was himself, and he died seemingly happy....

Dark Corners: Dead Silence

Dark Corners: Dead Silence

Dark Corners is a fortnightly feature focused purely on horror. From the classics to remakes, and even the lesser known flicks, they’ll all feature. This week sees one of James Wan’s earlier films that paved the way for his success with the likes of Insidious and The Conjuring. Dead Silence is one of those tricky horror films that clearly shows a director trying to find their style. A few years before James Wan would become a mainstream success with the likes of Insidious and The Conjuring under his belt, he came to the attention of many through his work with the Saw films. Saw had it’s own definitive style both in terms of look and tone. Though naturally, when Wan moved onto new projects, he tried to avoid using the same style and tricks in his past work. Thus his 2007 film Dead Silence came to be. Dead Silence marked the start of James Wan’s foray into the supernatural. The plot consists of the vengeful spirit of a persecuted ventriloquist and a young man’s attempt to get to the bottom of a dark secret that has plagued his home town. Admittedly, it’s all rather generic. The plot is definitely where Dead Silence falters, because it’s nothing new or all that interesting and feels like ground that has already been covered time and time again. What the iffy plot does do, however, is allow for some fantastic imagery to be created. Wan’s ability to create and project traditionally dark yet interesting imagery is fully on display within the opening shots. You can see his style–that he is now applauded for–in the raw stages throughout Dead Silence. A pitfall of many horror films, especially modern flicks, is their general overuse of static dull imagery that tries to be more gross than scary or creepy. Dead Silence, thankfully, keeps each shot chilling and intriguing. There are numerous shots that work perfectly with the bleak lighting throughout the film. Scenes are often masked by darkness but only to the point where they feel relevant to the scene but not in an obvious manner. It’s a trick that Wan would further develop to the point of perfection in his later work. In total, Dead Silence is a visually interesting film throughout, especially in terms of how it uses light (as previously mentioned) and audio together to create a brooding atmosphere. The problem with Dead Silence is mostly down to the plot and dull characters. The plot struggles to shake off a lingering feeling of being goofy and borderline Goosebumps-like. It leaves the film in this sort of grey area where the viewer doesn’t really know whether to take the film seriously or not. With that being said, however, there are some genuinely creepy moments towards the closing stages of the film, but these are often broken up by some elements of silliness that unfortunately extend to the rather comical plot twist ending. Dead Silence isn’t a bad film by any degree, it’s simply just a shallow one. It looks fantastic and showcases James Wan’s ability at creating truly fantastic horror imagery and atmospheres. His skills save Dead Silence from falling into a sea of generic and charmless horror films that popped up after the mainstream success of Saw. Horror fans, especially those who enjoyed The Conjuring and Insidious, will find Dead Silence an enjoyable way to spend ninety minutes. Everyone else may find it a little too generic and flat to bear.        ...

Why I’m Excited For Jurassic World

Why I’m Excited For Jurassic World

I’ve been a fan of Jurassic Park ever since seeing the first film back when I was a young child, and developing my love for dinosaurs. I always thought it was incredible and also a terrifying journey and have watched the first film/read the first book numerous times as not only is it my favorite film of all time, but also my favorite novel. It told a very unique, and captivating story. What if dinosaurs were around the same time as man? What if a group of people cloned dinosaurs and made a theme park? The novel/film told these stories brilliantly and to this day the film still holds the test of time, 20 years later. There was also a second film made based around the second novel in the series, The Lost World. Sure, the sequel may not have been as good as the previous film in the series but it took us on an even more terrifying journey to a dense jungle setting, and made the Raptors seem like more of a dangerous foe (yes, I’m talking about the tall grass scene). This film also made me terrified when I was younger when the Rex’s are pushing the trailer off the edge of the cliff. Lots of goodies in this second film, and lots more carnage. Seriously, the tall grass scene was brilliant. And seeing a T-Rex loose in San Diego was pretty sweet. Imagine a bunch of dinosaurs on the mainland attacking our cities? It would be juicy. Then much to my interest, a third film was spawned even though we had only two novels written before Michael Crichton passed away in 2008 at the age of 66. The third film released in 2001, and to this date is my least favorite of the Jurassic films. The first two films I’ve watched numerous times, probably close to the hundreds, and the third one has been about 5, or 6 times. I just can’t really enjoy it as much as the other two, even though it still captures that JP feel. I think my main concern for this film was replacing the T-Rex with the Spinosaurus. I understand that freshening things up is always good, but for some reason the new “big-dino” didn’t appeal to me too much, and didn’t seem as memorable as the Rex. However, that bit with the satellite phone was a neat idea. However, I do have to praise the third film quite a bit for one thing in particular. They took the Raptors that were so menacing in the first two films, and made them extremely intelligent, and just more terrifying than they were before. Kudos. And now, after finally leaving development hell we have confirmation of a fourth installment in the franchise being made, and rumored to hit theaters sometime next year. The fourth film, Jurassic World doesn’t have much information to go on, but has numerous plot-lines rumored to be attached to it. It will also take place 22 years after the first film, and is being directed by Colin Trevorrow with a June 12, 2015 release date. The most worrying being the “domesticated” dinosaurs who were going to be trained to fight in the military. I actually always thought this was just a rumor, and I believe it was shot down pretty quickly. I think I can speak for everyone that we’re glad this won’t be seeing the light of day. I hope. Bryce Dallas Howard, and Chris Pratt have been confirmed for the film. Now, this could just be silly “coincidences” but I seem to be leaning towards Bryce playing a a now adult, Lex Murphy or going from the red-hair maybe she’ll be portraying a love-child between Ian Malcolm and Sarah Harding? It could be unique to see what’s revealed over the coming months. I for one would love to see a return of Ian Malcom, but we’ll have to wait and see....

Doctor Who – What It Means To Me

Doctor Who – What It Means To Me

I know we’re a gaming focused website but I do like putting out my thoughts on other media platforms as well on here. I’d like to take a moment and chat about Doctor Who, and what it means to me, and why I consider it to be the best series ever made and to ever grace our television sets. Agree, or disagree it’s all about opinions from here on in. A show spanning 50 years, and still releasing new episodes. That’s pretty damn amazing. However, this article will contain spoilers so please read with caution if you’re not up to date on Doctor Who. I remember when I first heard of the show it was about 2006 and David Tennant was The Doctor. I always thought it was about some medical dude who could travel through space. That’s really all I thought it was, and it didn’t really interest me. I kept hearing stuff about it for years but always tuned it out, I wasn’t interested, and didn’t want to watch something that I thought would be boring, and just plain stupid. So, I just ignored people telling me to watch it and stuck to my anime (I had a huge anime phase around this time) and pretty much tuned out every other show on television. Fast forward to around 2010 and I was flicking through the channels and saw something with a man in a tweed jacket, bowtie, and interesting hair running about and stuff. It caught my attention and I watched for about 15 minutes before switching the channel out due to being heavily confused as to what was going on. I eventually found out that it was Doctor Who, but I was extremely confused as to who this man in the bowtie was as I thought The Doctor wore a brown trench-coat and had wild hair or something. This was also before I knew that the show had been one since 1963, and that the lead actor would always change due to an effect called regeneration. For those of you who don’t follow the show, it’s a sort of effect where Timelords (The Doctor’s race) can change every cell in their body to prevent themselves from dying. However, doing this causes their appearance to change and thus the reason for thirteen different actors to have played the part over the course of it’s fifty years on television. When I started watching Doctor Who in 2010 (started with two Tennant episodes) I thought David was the First Doctor, and that Matt was the second. But, I was clueless on how/why Matt was now The Doctor, and why David was no longer playing the part. So, I watched all of Matt’s run and was slightly confused on the whole thing. While watching Matt’s first series (Series 5) a friend of mine told me that another actor was The Doctor before David and his name was Christopher Eccleston, and that was an actor whom I had known from his roles in 28 Days Later, Gone In 60 Seconds, etc. So now, I thought Chris was the First Doctor to ever take the role, and then David, and finally Matt. I was still confused on how another actor could take the role though, and my friend told me all about regeneration and that The Doctor could change his cells, blah, blah to avoid death but essentially became a new man. This made sense to me, and explained why Matt was now The Doctor. So, I watched all of Matt’s episodes (Series 5), then went through all of David’s, and then watched all of Christopher’s. Backwards yes, but it just made more sense for me to do it that way. Then I sort of found out about all the other actors, and that the show had been around since 1963 which was a detail my friend who watched the show never told me. He had no idea that the show had other Doctors before Chris ever stepped into the TARDIS and this just fueled more interest in the show for me, and I soon found myself watching classic episodes of Doctor Who, and eventually stumbling onto some wonderful episodes starring my now two favorite classic Doctors, Jon Pertwee (Third Doctor) and Tom Baker (Fourth Doctor). I polished off most of Pertwee’s run on Doctor Who, and I’m currently making my way through Baker’s entire era. I’ve seen episodes from every Doctor’s run now, but Pertwee and Tom are the two classic Doctors that really got their hooks into me, and captivated me to follow their portrayal of The Doctor. Now, every actor who has taken over the role have been excellent but Tom Baker, and Jon Pertwee will always be the two Doctors who got me interested, and kept me interested in Classic Who. Something I guess most modern Who fans have trouble watching. I can understand why, but the stories in Classic Who are equally as good, if not better than what we’re offered in New Who sometimes. So, that being said if you’re a fan of Doctor Who, and haven’t seen anything from the classic series, please go check it out. It’s so darn good. The show also offers some of the most interesting stories, and concepts that I’ve ever seen. A police-box that travels through time & space, an alien-humanoid who can change his fan when he’s dying, uses a trusty device called a Sonic Screwdriver and doesn’t really believe in violence, and prefers talking problems out and solving them with his intellect. It’s pretty neat. However, the show has also been very good at capturing emotions and making the fans feel very…emotional when watching the program. Killing of characters, making emotional scenes, and even killing off the main character so to speak after fans have gotten emotionally attached to them, and then introduce a new man into the same clothes that your Doctor was wearing is quite the emotional rollercoaster, and something I never really experienced until 2013′s Christmas special where my Doctor, Matt Smith regenerated into Peter Capaldi. Even though the actors leave the role, they’re still The Doctor, and always will be The Doctor to the true Who fans. It’s also a show that can do something unique, and has the tendency to bring back Doctor’s for anniversary specials, which we saw in the 50th anniversary episode in November which brought back David Tennant (10th Doctor), gave a nice little cameo to Tom Baker (4th Doctor), gave us some more delicious information on an unknown incarnation “The War Doctor” (John Hurt) whom was between the Eighth Doctor (Paul McGann) and the Ninth Doctor (Christopher Eccleston). It also sort-of introduced Peter Capaldi, whom took over for Matt Smith and became the Twelfth Doctor on Christmas Day. I just think it’s really cool that this show is so unique and it’s really one of the only shows that allow different actors whom have played the role of The Doctor to interact with one another on screen and actually have a reason to explain how. Yes, they’re all different people but they do play the same man. So, he’ll always be The Doctor no matter what face he’s wearing. That’s pretty darn cool. The show is essentially about change when you get down to it, and it’s a really good way of explaining that change is a real thing that everyone needs to accept, and the show is constantly changing. The Doctor changes into a new man every so often, his companions always change, and the TARDIS (his ship) also changes constantly. The show is about change, and it’s been a good way for me to realize that life is all about change, and it helps me realize that change needs to happen for things to progress. Things never stay the same, change always happens, and we need to accept it. A good example is Matt Smith’s (Eleventh Doctor) exiting speech on Christmas Day right before he regenerated. He said, and I quote: We all change when you think about it. We’re all different people all through our lives, and that’s okay, that’s good. You gotta keep moving, so long as you remember all the people that you used to be. That’s a pretty nice quote explaining change, and how people should accept it. At least, that’s how I felt about it. It’s also very nice because Matt’s Doctor was known as the man who forgets, so the fact that he says he’ll remember his past lives, and the one that’s about to end is extremely touching and helped to deliver the emotion home, and break my hearts. It’s also an extremely easy show for me to relate to. I may not be an immortal, time-traveling alien from space, but The Doctor in all sense of the word is an extremely lonely man, much like myself. He can essentially never die, and is a quirky man that would sometimes be classified as crazy. He’s an odd person, a loner at times and I can really relate to that. I’m a very lonely, depressed person and just being able to watch this show and relate to situations that The Doctor is in really makes me care for the character that much more and is part of the reason I love the show, and love The Doctor so much. It doesn’t make me feel like I’m alone when I watch it, and it makes my imagination run wild. What if I was The Doctor, what if I got to travel through time & space? It’s a show that makes you happy, and sad at the same time but also fuels the imagination and gives you characters you can relate to, and ultimately come to love. What more could you want in something? Sure, the show can hit ruts once and a while but as do all other programs. But, I still want to continue watching and see what happens to these characters, and just see these amazing adventures, and places that I know I’d never get to see, or experience on my own. It’s a thrill ride, and Doctor Who knows how to deliver. It’s also quite fair to say that The Doctor is also by far the most interesting character on television today, and quite possibly in all of television’s history. We have a time-traveling alien, who can change his face, and ultimately never die. He’s had numerous faces, numerous companions, travels in a police box, fights aliens & monsters, saves planets, and is the true definition of a hero. He rarely uses weapons, and rarely ever kills someone to end a problem. He’s peace-loving, and someone that people should look up to. He’s the type of person that everyone should strive to be, even though he’s kind of wacky and out there. Not only does his face change, but as does his personality, habits, etc. One incarnation could be a grumpy man, and the next could be a bumbling clown who plays a recorder. That’s another interesting trait about the show, and The Doctor himself. It’s a new ride, and adventure every time someone new steps into the TARDIS. He’s the same man in essence, but he’s always a different person when you think about it. Just like Matt’s quote from above states. Cool, isn’t it? Lots of people may judge the show, and think it’s silly without giving it a chance. Then again, it is silly and that’s what makes it so great. It captures our imagination, and gives us these experience we’d never have the chance to do ourselves. And, I’m trying to explain the show as best as I can in this article, even though I feel like I’m not really doing the show much justice. It’s difficult to get 50 years worth of content down into an article without boring people, and pushing them away with what I’m trying to convey and say about this show. A show that means a lot to me, and has helped me through depression, and other numerous issues in my life. You could sort of say that The Doctor truly was a Doctor and helped out issues, and ailments that afflicted me. It opened my eyes, and made me realize things weren’t always going to be bad, and things would change, and get better. Maybe that’s why the show means so much to me, maybe that’s why I hold it so close to my heart, and maybe it’s due to the fact that it’s the most interesting, captivating, and coolest show on television, and in my opinion will always be the best show on television. Sorry, Breaking Bad. So, when people ask me about Doctor Who and why they should watch it I don’t really give them any reasons other than it being interesting. I believe the show captivates, and captures the minds of it’s fans differently than others. We each have our own stories, and experiences with the show, just as every fan/Whovian has someone they call their Doctor. The Doctor they relate the most to, love the most, and most of the time is the one they started with. Is any one Doctor better than the others? Sure, but that doesn’t stop the fact that they’ve all been brilliant in the role, and that they’re all The Doctor. I’m a fan of all of the incarnations, but Matt is still my Doctor and I’ll still hold him close to my hearts than the others, but that doesn’t mean I snuff them, and hate them. They’re all The Doctor, and are all just as brilliant. And now I’m sitting here waiting until August of this year to see more Doctor Who episodes, and see the new Doctor. Number Twelve get up to some antics in the TARDIS, and usher in a new era of the show with a new face, and new actor with Peter Capaldi. Sure, some “fans” got all mad about him not being as attractive as the previous New Who Timelords, but he’s a brilliant actor and that’s what matters in the end. Peter is also an extremely handsome fellow, and in my opinion can be pretty spiffy in a suit (Malcom Tucker anyone?). However, this is an issue that bothers me about some of the fans of Doctor Who. It seems that these fans only liked David because he was “hot” and disliked Matt a lot for taking over David’s spot in the show. And now that Matt has been replaced by an older man (55 years old) they’re throwing a hissy fit because he isn’t “sexy” and because he’s old. It just bothers me to the core, and makes me realize that these aren’t fans of the show. Adapt to change, realize that The Doctor will always change, and never be the same face forever. Times change, and so must he. Sure, it sucks when your favorite Doctor leaves but that doesn’t mean that the new guy is a horrid human being, and will be a terrible Doctor. Heck, I think Matt blew David out of the water in terms of being The Doctor, but they brought their own unique spin on the role as did every other actor. Complaining that the Doctor is an old man? He’s been played by older actors before. William Hartnell, whom played the first Doctor was the same age as Peter Capaldi when he took the role. Even John Hurt whom played the “forgotten incarnation” in Day Of The Doctor is 73, and was equally as brilliant in the role, and I think deserves his own series. Age, looks, accents, ethnicity, etc shouldn’t be a deciding factor of how a Doctor is good or not. It comes down to the portrayal, and the way they embody the character. Every Doctor has been good, and the showrunners, and people behind the show know what they’re doing. Every Doctor has been good, every Doctor from here on in will be good. So hell, bring on Capaldi. This is probably coming off a big, rambly post but I’m doing my best to really explain my emotions, and feeling towards the show. So, if you’re still reading I thank you, and applaud you for following along and still keeping some shred of interest in my insanity. Now, the show may have a ton of excellent episodes behind it, and some pretty neat ideas but there’s a lot of crap too. I can’t praise the show entirely, and do have to say there’s some negative aspects about it, but it doesn’t really take away from the Who experience as a whole, and I’ve found most of these issues in New Who. There’s always some episodes in the series that don’t really jive, and at times can be hard to watch. We saw a couple during Tennant’s era, and Matt’s era was plagued by a few of these. Most people will argue that Steven Moffat isn’t a good writer, but I don’t agree. I think he’s an excellent writer, and story-teller I just think he’s run as the showrunner, and head writer on Doctor Who has run its course. His stories have gotten stale, (as we saw in most of Series 7) and some of his characters, and ideas just don’t feel right being in Doctor Who and for me don’t really mesh. I’m also not really a fan of this whole having companions fall in love with The Doctor, and having sexual tension between him and his companions. What happened to him being a mentor, and teacher to them like in the Classic days? Can we go back to that? Can we stop having them fall in love with him? I enjoy lots of Steven’s work on Doctor Who, but Series 7 really proved that he’s gotten stale and seems to be running out of ideas for the show. Sure, his stuff could pick up, and improve during Series 8 and Capaldi’s run as The Doctor, but I think his time should be up soon too. Bring on a new showrunner, let someone else take the reigns. Everything changes, and that’s not a bad thing. I’d still love to see Mark Gatiss take over as showrunner, or even Neil Gaiman. One can dream. One can only dream. Now, more than just The Doctor, the time travel, and his TARDIS are memorable on the show. We also have some really memorable scenes, companions, and most of all the monsters that he encounters in his travels. The most famous, and prominent of those are the Daleks. The Doctor’s ultimate foe. These guys are awesome, and are pretty darn terrifying. They show no compassion, no remorse, and essentially kill everything in their paths. They also have one of the most memorable catchphrases in the history of the show, and that’s “Exterminate”. A phrase they say before attacking, and dispatching their foes. Pretty great stuff the Daleks. We also have other monsters like the Cybermen, Weeping Angels, Sea Devils, Ice Warriors, Silurians, Sontarans, Silents, and heck even evil Snowmen that eat people. So, not only is the show good at creating memorable characters, it’s also great at creating terrifying monsters that can intimidate, and frighten even the oldest viewer of the show. So, in the end I’m grateful to the BBC, and everyone who got Doctor Who off the ground, and an actual thing back in 1963. Without them this show wouldn’t be around today, and wouldn’t have garnered such a fan following fifty years later. It’s beaten the test of time, and came out victorious. Doctor Who is here to stay, and I have no doubts that it will be around for another fifty years and we’ll be sitting on the 24th Doctor, or something like that. Doctor Who means the world to me, and it’s simply the best bit of entertainment on television today. So, to honor all the wonderful actors that have brought this show, and excellent character to life here’s a video of below just how unique, interesting, and emotional the whole regeneration concept of the show can be. Again, warning the video does contain spoilers. Thanks for reading.                    ...

Farewell To Eleven

Farewell To Eleven

Later today we’ll see the end of Matt Smith’s era on Doctor Who, and his regeneration into the Twelfth Doctor which is being portrayed by the fantastic actor, Peter Capaldi. I’ll be extremely sad to see Matt go as he is essentially my Doctor, and the one I’ve really gotten attached to more than any other actor who’s been in the role. However, I’m also really excited to see Peter take over the helm of the TARDIS, and have some adventures of his own. As a sort of tribute to Matt Smith, and the beloved Eleventh Doctor, I’ve decided to compile a list of my favorite episodes, and moments featuring the Raggedy Man himself. Warning, if you’re not caught up on Doctor Who there will be spoilers in this list. I’ll also include clips of said moments as reference. Eleven moments, to commemorate the Eleventh Doctor. I wish there was a way I could put Matt’s regeneration scene into this list as I imagine it will be spectacular when it airs later today. However, this is a list of all of his adventures, and best moments to date before the airing of Time Of The Doctor. Either way, Geronimo! 1. The Rings Of Akhaten – The Doctor’s Speech (S07E07) I know not many people enjoyed this episode, but I had a great time with it. The setting was interesting, the villain was pretty unique, and we got see a very emotional side of Matt’s Doctor and to which he had one of his best performances to date as the Timelord. Of course, the whole bit with Clara and her leaf memories saving the day seemed to take away from Matt’s speech, and really didn’t make much sense to me. It’s no doubt that the Eleventh Doctor was great with speeches, and it’ll be sad to see that go when he regenerates. But, who knows? Maybe Peter will be stellar in that aspect too. But in all seriousness, this is one of Matt’s defining moments as The Doctor and he really came into his own with this. Plus, the song in the background really aided the scene. One of my favorite moments in all of New Who. 2. The Eleventh Hour – The Doctor Will See You Now (S05E01) Matt’s first debut episode as The Doctor, and he did a brilliant job taking over from David Tennant. We get some crazy antics with him eating fish fingers & custard, having banter with a young Amelia Pond, all while saving the planet during a post-regeneration state, and without his TARDIS or trusty Sonic. Near the end of the episode he saves the planet from the Atraxi burning it to stop Prisoner Zero’s escape, and in turn causes Matt to call the Atraxi back and deliver this nice bit of dialogue all while he puts on his initial outfit and a hologram shows all of his previous faces. This part of the episode made me get hooked initially on the show right away, and caused me to plow through all of Matt’s stuff, then onto David’s, and Christopher’s all while I waited for Series 7 to start. 3. A Good Man Goes To War – Colonel Runaway (S06E07) A moment where we get to see a sort of angrier/darker side to Matt’s Doctor when he confronts the Colonel and gets extremely angry. He heads to Demon’s Run, where Amy Pond and her daughter Melody are being held by the religious order called The Silence. He recruits numerous allies to help in a bloody battle, and where we also see the debut of the Paternoster Gang (Strax, Jenny and Vastra). What ensues is a battle where casualties happen, and we find out that Melody was just a flesh-duplicate and disintegrates as Kavorian escapes, however in this episode we also find out that River Song is actually the daughter of Amy Pond, and Rory Williams. Very fun episode, and emotional at bits too! 4. The Angels Take Manhattan – Pond’s Farewell (S07E05) Another scene showing the amount of emotion that Matt can portray as an actor, but also showing how much his Doctor loved these companions. Sure, Rory’s departure was kind of lackluster but when Amy gets zapped back from the angel is what truly breaks The Doctor. She was the first face that his face had seen, and he had known her since she was a little girl. He called them his best friends, and you could tell there was a very strong connection, and sense of love between them. After creating numerous paradoxes in New York to save Rory, them being zapped back made it so The Doctor would never be able to see them again. An emotional exit, and we see some really tremendous acting from Matt Smith. Apologies for the clip used in advance, couldn’t find a good one on YouTube. 5. The Snowmen – Sherlock Holmes (2012 Christmas Special) Lots of funny banter, an emotional Doctor after the death of the Ponds, the sort-of introduction to the new companion, and the return of an old enemy, The Great Intelligence. We also get a somewhat “darker” Christmas story with the Snowmen whom devour people, and are just truly menacing looking things. We see the return of the Paternoster gang with a very much alive, Strax whom was presumably killed in the battle of Demon’s Run. The Doctor refuses to help the human race while these weird Snowmen creatures start popping up but decides to help after Clara makes a reference to a “pond” which sparks The Doctor’s interest and causes him to investigate. We also learn that this girl, Clara was also in the Dalek Asylum in the first episode of the Seventh Series and we learn this when she mentions souffles, and telling The Doctor “Run you clever boy, and remember” which she said in the Dalek Asylum, but as a different version of herself which gets explained in the Series 7 finale, Name Of The Doctor. The scene in question for this moment is The Doctor acting like Sherlock Holmes, all while making some “snow” related jokes and annoying the villain. 6. The Name Of The Doctor – River’s Goodbye (S07E13) The finale of Series 7, and Matt’s last full-length series as The Doctor. This episode ties up the mystery behind Clara, and we also get a glimpse of Trenzalore where The Doctor’s final resting place is. The Great Intelligence returns in the body of Simeon from The Snowmen, and it also introduces some creepy new monsters called The Whispermen. The episode also has a post-library “ghost” of River Song talking, and interacting with Clara which leads the group into The Doctor’s tomb which results in the culmination of the episode, as well as revealing John Hurt as an unknown incarnation of The Doctor (Between 8 and 9/The War Doctor) and revealing that this is the Doctor’s biggest secret, the incarnation that fought in the Time War. Really neat episode, and it also proved a very emotional scene with River’s possible farewell. I really hope this was the last we saw of River. It’s an emotional exit, and it worked really well for her character. The emotional bit being River thinking The Doctor can’t see her, but the truth is that he can. 7. Nightmare In Silver – Mr. Clever (S07E12) I really enjoyed seeing Matt take on a more villainous approach in an episode, and he worked wonders as Mr. Clever. Going from imitating two of his previous incarnations (Eccleston, and Tennant) to battling his own self within his mind in a game of chess. Some excellent acting from Matt Smith in this episode, and the whole concept of Mr. Clever whom was the Cyber Planner’s name for himself after taking over Matt’s brain. A fun episode, with some hiccups here and there (those kids were awful). I’m still speculating that Mr. Clever, or the Cyber Planner will make a return appearance in Matt’s regeneration story later today. 8. The Pandorica Opens – Pandorica Speech (S05E12) Another example of Matt Smith’s stellar example of doing speeches. This speech is referencing the opening of the Pandorica, and the essential end of the universe that culminates in the Big Bang happening again in the finale for Series 5. We also see a whole slew of monsters from the past come to the Pandorica to stop The Doctor, which we find out is essentially a prison built to cage him, in which they think will stop the end of the universe. They’re wrong, and it ends but no worries. The Doctor, Amy, and Auton Rory save the day in the following episode with an emotional scene of Matt Smith flying into the exploding TARDIS via the Pandorica, and sealing all the cracks in time. 9. The Eleventh Hour – Fish Fingers & Custard (S05E01) This whole scene with Matt Smith having essentially just regenerated and crashing into Amy’s shed is hilarious. It’s his true first scene as The Doctor and it’s fully of oddities, and some weird food related jokes. We also meet his first companion when she was a young girl, and he soon investigates a crack in her wall which sets up the entire plot for Series 5, which the cracks are made from the TARDIS exploding, which will be explained in Matt’s regeneration story tonight in Time Of The Doctor. This also spawned a food combination that some brave Whovians have tried which is taking Fish Fingers and dipping them in custard. A pretty neat and fun way to introduce the Eleventh. 10. The End Of Time – Ten Regenerates (David Tennant Specials) Regeneration scenes are pretty crucial in the history of the show. You have to give the exiting Doctor a tremendous goodbye, but also give the new Doctor a pretty good welcoming scene so they aren’t hated right off the bat. Sadly, Matt’s run was filled with people complaining about him taking over from David Tennant, and that Matt was a horrible Doctor. It’s a shame that so much negativity had filled his run from these Tennant fan-boys that it’s quite upsetting, but it didn’t stop Matt from being a tremendous Doctor, and also having one of my favorite post-regeneration scenes in the history of the show. He soon made me forget that I was sad about David’s “I don’t want to go” and I immediately welcomed in Matt with open arms. I know the same will be for Capaldi when Matt regenerates into him later today. I can’t wait. 11. Day Of The Doctor – The Great Curator (50th Anniversary Special) Alright, so this scene may be more of a tribute to Tom Baker, but I just loved the interaction between Matt and one of the actors whom had portrayed a classic Who Doctor, the Fourth Doctor to be exact. Tom Baker is my favorite Classic Doctor and seeing an interaction between him and Matt Smith on screen at the same time warmed my hearts, and ignited the little fanboy inside me. Sure, Tom drove the scene but just the whole reaction from Matt in this scene was what helped sell the scene and is a moment that I’ll remember for the rest of my life as a fan of the show. Two incredible actors, whom in my opinion played the two best incarnations of the Timelord. Spectacular scene. And, from what I remember it’s pretty much the only time Tom Baker fully appeared back in a Doctor Who anniversary episode.  ...

My Top Five Doctors – Doctor Who

My Top Five Doctors – Doctor Who

Purely an opinion piece on my top 5 Doctors who taken the role of The Doctor in the hit sci-fi series, Doctor Who. Mainly doing this piece considering the 50th anniversary is about a week away, and felt it would only be fitting to make something Who related for the anniversary here on Pixel Gate. I decided to make a list of my Top 5 favorite Doctors in the programme. So, without further ado, allons-y! The Doctor is a Timelord, and when he’s on the verge of dying he can “regenerate” his body which changes all of his cells, and his appearance changes into a new man (hence new actors taking over the role, and why the show has been here for 50 years). Eleven actors have portrayed The Doctor (not counting John Hurt’s War Doctor) up to this point, with Peter Capaldi being the 12th Doctor this Christmas, whom is taking over for Matt Smith who is leaving the show at Christmas. Let’s get on with the list. 5. Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) My first classic Doctor, and Jon Pertwee was brilliant in the role. He was dapper, suave, and the way he talked really mesmerized me for some reason. He was also the Doctor to have Sarah Jane Smith (one of the best companions in the history of the show) introduced to the series as a companion. My first story of Pertwee’s run was The Time Warrior which also introduced the Sontarans, as a new enemy of The Doctor, and I really enjoyed the dynamic he & Sarah Jane brought to the table. I nearly finished his run on Doctor Who, but got distracted by someone recommending I check out this next Doctor below… 4. Eighth Doctor (Paul McGann) Even though McGann only starred in the 1996 television film Doctor Who, he still made a wonderful Doctor. Dashingly handsome, and the first of the Doctors to be a sort of romantic fellow, he helped pave the way for the new era of Doctors which would show up about 9 years later, with Christoper Eccleston in the revised series in 2005. Even though he’s had numerous audio plays, and other tie-in media he had just recently stepped back into the shoes of this incarnation in the 50th anniversary mini-sode, Night Of The Doctor which I’ll post at the bottom of this article. Also, having just listened to Light At The End, an audio-play celebrating 50 years of Doctor, it gave me more of an appreciation for Paul’s Doctor. I only wish he got his own series, and maybe even should of been the one to come back in 2005 with the revived series. 3. Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) Yes, I may have never finished Pertwee’s run of Doctor Who (something I plan to do soon) I couldn’t help but check out the Fourth Doctor, Tom Baker after having so many people tell me he’s one of the best, and rightfully so. Witty, funny, but also extremely serious when the time came, Tom Baker brought something new to Doctor Who, and made the character so very alien, like he should be. The Doctor is an alien after-all, and Tom Baker nailed that to the core. I’ve watched about three seasons of him in action, and have loved every minute of it. Let it be known, I’m not biased and have seen every Doctor in something and am not basing this list on a few handful of Doctors. This is based on all of the current 11 incarnations. Plus, that scarf is just so damn iconic. I want one! 2. Tenth Doctor (David Tennant) Some of you modern Who fans may crucify me because Tennant isn’t number one on the list, and that’s okay. I may have started watching Doctor Who with David Tennant (even though Matt was already The Doctor) but it doesn’t mean he’s my favorite, but it’s pretty close. Very, very close. David brought a more human side to The Doctor, and it made him easier to relate with than past incarnations of the Timelord, and that’s part of my draw to him. That, and his stories were wonderfully written, and he was a fantastic Doctor. His final episode as The Doctor may have had mixed opinions amongst the fan-base, but his regeneration was very emotional for me, as he was essentially the first Doctor I had ever watched, and at the time was my Doctor. I loved David, and still go back and watch his episodes quite frequently. However, for me there’s another actor who really feels like The Doctor to me, and will always be my Doctor for the rest of time & space… 1. Eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith) My Doctor, Matt Smith. He feels like the most alien of the Doctors, but also does feel like he’s the oldest (which he is), and can still come off as youthful, and exuberant. Now, most people have given Matt’s run a lot of crap for him replacing their favorite, “hot” Doctor, David Tennant but that’s just the nature of the show, and even though every Doctor is great I feel like Matt Smith at the current point in time is the genuine article you might say, and for me the best of the best. His run has also had the most emotional bits, and made me tear up the most. Whether it was the Pond’s final farewell (even though I didn’t really care for Amy, it was still emotional) his speech in Rings Of Akhaten, he knew how to capture emotion very well, and made me sympathize for him, and I think that’s why I love him so much. I relate to this Doctor the most in being that I’m lonely, I’m zany, wacky and all around crazy, but I do have very strong emotions for the people I care about, and will do whatever it takes to make sure the people I care about are safe. His Doctor had occasional moments of darkness, and I really liked it. And, I know for damn sure that come Christmas, I will weep like an angel when the regeneration scene happens and we say goodbye to Eleven, and welcome in Twelve. I’ll miss you Matt, but I will also welcome Peter in with open arms. The show is about change, and I already know Peter will do a wonderful job. — Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary episode ‘Day Of The Doctor’ airs on television, and theaters around the world next week on November 23rd. Below are two clips celebrating 50 years of time & space. The Night Of The Doctor which is the an appearance of Paul McGann as Eighth Doctor, and a trailer for The Day Of The Doctor which brings David Tennant back as the Tenth Doctor.      ...

Review: Supernatural — S09E05 “Dog Dean Afternoon”

Review: Supernatural — S09E05 “Dog Dean Afternoon”

Supernatural is back again this week with another “monster of the week” episode, and ends up being an extremely light-hearted and fun adventure. Spoilers Ahead: The episode opens in a taxidermist’s workshop with a man making some Game Of Thrones-esque sculptures using what appears to be a muskrat. The man hears a sound, and goes to investigate only to find nothing in the shop. He returns to his workstation and is immediately surprised by a man wearing a cowboy outfit whom then flashes a forked tongue (much like a snake) and constricts him to death, much like an anaconda would while the taxidermist’s dog, Colonel watches as his master is killed. Very straight to the point, and it left me wondering what the monster was. Some type of snake creature? That’s what it looked like we were going to get, so I was instantly hooked. The brothers eventually end up investigating the case, even though Dean says it might not be a good idea saying how Sam is still on the mend from the Trials in the previous season (even though we know it has something to do with Zeke; the angel possessing Sam). Once getting there they learn that the dog, Colonel was the only other person there during the death of the owner, and head back to their motel room to investigate a strange symbol they found on the shop door, believing it to be some sort of Wiccan symbol. The brothers learn the symbo isn’t Wiccan in nature at all, but is instead the logo of a local “Peta-like” group whom tried using scare tactics to stop the taxidermist’s business by covering his front door in blood, and writing death threats in the blood. However, they tell the brothers that they were scared off by hissing, and believing they were sprayed with mace. They remove their glasses to reveal injured eyes, and Sam reveals through research that the injuries were most likely caused by snake venom being spat into the eyes. This confuses the brothers as snakes who constrict won’t use venom, and vice versa. The brothers are then drawn to an animal shelter where another victim has been found with slash marks on his neck, as if he was mauled by some sort of cat. The victim whom had discovered the “cowboy” man eating a cat, was then promptly killed. Thus revealing some more interesting details about the killer/monster. He’s obviously not a snake creature, as snakes don’t use claws to kill their prey. So, what is he? Dean then notices the same dog from the first crime scene locked up at the animal shelter, and realizes that this dog, Colonel had witnessed both deaths of the taxidermist, and teenager working at the shelter. Sam mentions an old Eskimo spell that would allow the person to “mind-meld” with an animal, and communicate with them. They make the spell, and Dean drinks the concoction but is let down when nothing happens, and that he can’t talk to Colonel who is now with them in the motel. Then, out of the blue a mysterious voice tells Dean to change the channel, and we soon realize it’s the dog, and that Dean can now communicate with all types of animals. However, the mind-meld worked both ways and now Dean has acquired some dog-like traits, which is shown by him playing fetch with Sam, and barking at the mail-man. Colonel tells them what the killer looks like, so the Brothers and Colonel head to the shelter so Dean can get some more clues from the other animals there. This in turn gives us a hilarious little bit where Sam must rub the belly of a dog so it can give Dean clues about the killer, whom we then learn is the head-chef at a restaurant. Upon arriving at the restaurant, Sam realizes that the Chef is eating animal organs, and obtaining some abilities of said animals using a shamanistic ritual. The duo decide to split-up and kill the Chef, which results in Sam being attacked by the Chef who has been concealed against a wall, like a chameleon and slashes at Sam’s throat, delivering a fatal blow. However, Zeke takes control again and heals Sam’s wound which obviously confuses Sam, but also intrigues the Chef who now intends on devouring Sam’s heart and gaining his healing abilities to help rid himself of his cancer. Dean encounters the scenario, and is attacked and tied up by the Chef who contemplates on how he’ll kill Dean, before eating a Wolf heart. Dean manages to break-free, and leads the Chef on a chase leading outside where Dean calls on a pack of dogs he let free earlier on in the episode who eventually tear the Chef to pieces killing him. A pretty hilarious way to kill someone in my opinion, and the episode in general took us away from all the dark, and gritty and gave us something humorous and light-hearted. The ending also lends itself to question whether Sam is starting to realize something is going on with the whole “healing” and blacking out thing. I’d be questioning things myself if I knew my throat was gashed open, but then the next minute it was completely healed. I guess we’ll see what happens next week. Definitely a good episode of Supernatural, even though it felt like it was resolved a little too quickly and that things just happened to fall into place. I guess that’s what we should expect in a more “positive mood” episode. Lots of humor to this one. I give it an 8/10.  ...

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