A Final Goodbye To Fallout: A Fans Farewell

A Final Goodbye To Fallout: A Fans Farewell

As a franchise, Fallout has tended to maintain a high standard. Aside from spin-offs, the experiences on offer have constantly been enjoyable. From the top down view, to the modern first person, the stories told have been memorable. Things changed with Fallout 4.

At its worst, Fallout still managed to create good stories. The latest entry into the franchise bucked the trend, and bucked it hard. No longer was the story directed by the player. With a new found focus on linear narrative, Fallout 4 pushed and nudged the player forward. Dialogue options stripped back to nods and shakes of the head. Player choice reduced to nothing but a lie.

Fallout 4 signalled the transition we’d all been expecting. Streamlined story telling, more action with less talk, this is what Fallout grew into it. There’s nothing wrong, franchises need to adopt to survive. Grasping onto the idea of what Fallout was isn’t productive. This was always going to happen.

I can still recall the sense of disappointment that washed over me when the credits began to roll. No nods towards my previous choices. What happened to the people I had helped? Who went onto to greater/worse things? Fallout 4 skipped all of this, it merely ended. This was not the Fallout way.

Fallout 4 marked the end of my interest in the franchise. Not because it’s a bad game, but because it’s no longer the franchise I knew. The changes made clearly had the desired affect. Fallout 4 sales hit impressive numbers, brand recognition increased and critics love it.

No longer do I see Fallout as the franchise I can count on for quality RPG experiences. The last two games may have been departures from the originals, but they still had numerous core elements. Numerous dialogue options, deep side quests and builds that affected the whole game. All Fallout 4 had was Nick Valentine and a decent map.

So long Fallout, the franchise that introduced me to so many wonderful things. Harold, the man turned tree. Dog Meat, the best dog you could ever ask for. Cannibals with manners, Super Mutants with brains and mystery strangers. All the sweet stuff that Fallout has contained. It may be changing into something I don’t like, but least I’ll have the memories.

 

 

Sean Halliday


2 Comments

  1. Grifman
    January 19, 2016, 5:11 pm

    This comment in the article makes no sense:

    [quote]The latest entry into the franchise bucked the trend, and bucked it hard. No longer was the story directed by the player. With a new found focus on linear narrative, Fallout 4 pushed and nudged the player forward. [/quote]

    Seriously? In Fallout 3, which the author says he liked, you had to find your father, no choice, you had to ally with the Bos, no choice, you had to destroy the Enclave, no choice. Yes, in Fallout 4 you are married and have a child, yet in Fallout 4, you can ally with various factions, and destroy various factions. all your choice. There is far more choice in Fallout 4 than Fallout 3.

    • Sean Halliday
      January 19, 2016, 10:30 pm

      I was referring to the side quests and their outcomes. Dialogue system , interesting plots and outcomes in the side quests is why i said that part you quoted. With that being said, Fallout 3 least had the manners to inform me of how my actions affected the world.

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